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Hungry bug seeks hot meal
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Who's Knocking?
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Roboroach and Company
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The (kids') eyes have it
Between a rock and a wet place
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The solar system's biggest junkyard
Earth from the inside out
Moon Crash, Splash
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An Ancient Feathered Biplane
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Dino Takeout for Mammals
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Earth
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
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Earth from the inside out
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Power of the Wind
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To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
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Building a Food Pyramid
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Math Naturals
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
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Crustaceans
Mammals
Little Brown Bats
Ferrets
Platypus
Parents
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Invisibility Ring
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Nature's Alphabet
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Crocodiles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
A Change in Climate
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Arctic Melt
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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