Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Toads
Animals
Jay Watch
How to Fly Like a Bat
Red Apes in Danger
Behavior
Fish needs see-through head
Listen and Learn
Math is a real brain bender
Birds
Robins
Macaws
Eagles
Chemistry and Materials
Fog Buster
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rocking the House
Ancient Heights
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
A Change in Time
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Watching deep-space fireworks
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Sturgeons
Barracudas
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
The Essence of Celery
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math Naturals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Foul Play?
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Scallops
Flatworms
Crawfish
Mammals
Hamsters
Deers
Bumblebee Bats
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Dreams of Floating in Space
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Flower family knows its roots
Springing forward
Reptiles
Cobras
Komodo Dragons
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Arctic Melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
Where rivers run uphill
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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