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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
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A Recipe for Happiness
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Electronic Paper Turns a Page
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A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Earth from the inside out
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A Change in Leaf Color
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Little People Cause Big Surprise
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A Taste for Cheese
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GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
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How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Detecting True Art
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
A New Touch
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
One ring around them all
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
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Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Black Holes That Burp
Chaos Among the Planets
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Reach for the Sky
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
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Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Catching Some Rays
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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