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New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
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Toads
Salamanders and Newts
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Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
New Mammals
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Pipefish power from mom
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Math is a real brain bender
Birds
Robins
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Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Heaviest named element is official
The Taste of Bubbles
Computers
The science of disappearing
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Giant snakes invading North America
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Untangling Human Origins
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Electric Catfish
Tiger Sharks
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Strong Bones for Life
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Play for Science
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
The tell-tale bacteria
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Snails
Sea Urchin
Oysters
Mammals
Chipmunks
German Shepherds
Porcupines
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Speedy stars
Gaining a Swift Lift
Project Music
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Fungus Hunt
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Asp
Rattlesnakes
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Searching for Alien Life
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Science loses out when ice caps melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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