Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Newts
Animals
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
A Tongue and a Half
Roboroach and Company
Behavior
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
The (kids') eyes have it
Body clocks
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Parrots
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Screaming for Ice Cream
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Lighting goes digital
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Petrified Lightning
A Global Warming Flap
Environment
A Stormy History
To Catch a Dragonfly
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
A Big Discovery about Little People
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Carp
Puffer Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
It's a Math World for Animals
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Foul Play?
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Snails
Krill
Beetles
Mammals
Pugs
Tigers
Elk
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Iguanas
Cobras
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Baby Star
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Recipe for a Hurricane
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Roadrunners

The roadrunners are two species of bird in the genus Geococcyx of the cuckoo family, Cuculidae, native to North and Central America. These two species are ground foraging cuckoos called the Greater Roadrunner and Lesser Roadrunner. Weights and Measures: Roadrunner species generally range in size from 18-24 inches in length from tail to beak. The roadrunner is large, slender, black-brown and white streaked ground bird with a distinctive head crest. It has long legs, strong feet, and an oversized dark bill. The tail is broad with white tips on the 3 outer tail feathers. During flight the wings are short and rounded and reveal a white crescent in the primary feathers Eye Patch: They have a blank patch of skin behind the eye that is shaded blue proximally to red distally. The lesser roadrunner is slightly smaller, not as streaky, and has a smaller bill. They are large long-legged birds with long thick dark bills and long dark tails. Fast on Their Feet: Roadrunners are terrestrial, and although capable of flight, they spend most of their time on the ground. Roadrunners and other members of the cuckoo family have zygodactyl feet (two toes in front and two toes in back). Roadrunners are able to run up to 15 miles per hour and generally prefer sprinting to flying. Greater Roadrunner Habitat: Their breeding habitat is desert and shrubby country in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. They can be seen in the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Oklahoma, Kansas, and rarely in Arkansas and Louisiana. The Roadrunner is the state bird of New Mexico. Diet: Roadrunners are omnivores and are opportunistic. Their diet normally consist of insects (such as grasshoppers, crickets, catepillars, and beetles), small reptiles (such as lizards and snakes, including rattlesnakes), rodents and small mammals, tarantulas, scorpions, centipedes, spiders, small birds and fruits and seeds like prickly pear cactus and sumac. The lesser roadrunner eats mainly insects. Roadrunners forage on the ground usually running after prey under cover, they may leap to catch insects, and commonly batter certain prey, like snakes, against the ground. Baby, it's Cold Outside: During the cold desert night the roadrunner lowers its body temperature slightly, going into a slight torpor to conserve energy. To warm itself during the day, the roadrunner exposes dark patches of skin on its back to the sun. Courtship: Cuckoos are commonly solitary birds or live in pairs. They are monogamous and a pair may mate for life. Pairs may hold a territory all year. During the courtship display, the male bows, alternately lifting and dropping his wings and spreading his tail. He parades in front of the female with his head high and his tail and wings drooped. It has also been documented that the male may bring an offering of food to the female. Roadrunners mate spring to mid-summer depending upon species and geographic location. Nest: Roadrunners nest are often on a platform nest composed of sticks (nest may sometimes contain leaves, snakeskins, or dung). The nest are commonly placed in a low tree, bush, or cactus. Nestlings: Hatching is asynchronous and average a 2-6 egg clutch (the Lesser Roadrunners clutch size is typically smaller). Eggs are generally a white color. Roadrunners have bi-parental care. Both sexes incubate the nest and feed the hatchlings, but males incubate the nest at night. For the first one to two weeks after the young hatch, one parent always remains at the nest. After the hatchlings are two to three weeks old they leave and never return to the nest. For a few day thereafter, the parents and young forage together.

Roadrunners
Roadrunners








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™