Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Color-Changing Bugs
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Behavior
The Electric Brain
Eating Troubles
The (kids') eyes have it
Birds
Turkeys
Doves
Kingfishers
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Atom Hauler
Computers
Programming with Alice
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Digging for Ancient DNA
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
Springing forward
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Environment
A Change in Climate
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Writing on eggshells
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Parrotfish
Barracudas
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Sponges' secret weapon
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
The tell-tale bacteria
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Crabs
Crawfish
Flatworms
Mammals
Felines
Ponies
Woolly Mammoths
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Gaining a Swift Lift
Road Bumps
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Fastest Plant on Earth
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Asp
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
An Earthlike Planet
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Searching for Alien Life
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Where rivers run uphill
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Change in Climate
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Roadrunners

The roadrunners are two species of bird in the genus Geococcyx of the cuckoo family, Cuculidae, native to North and Central America. These two species are ground foraging cuckoos called the Greater Roadrunner and Lesser Roadrunner. Weights and Measures: Roadrunner species generally range in size from 18-24 inches in length from tail to beak. The roadrunner is large, slender, black-brown and white streaked ground bird with a distinctive head crest. It has long legs, strong feet, and an oversized dark bill. The tail is broad with white tips on the 3 outer tail feathers. During flight the wings are short and rounded and reveal a white crescent in the primary feathers Eye Patch: They have a blank patch of skin behind the eye that is shaded blue proximally to red distally. The lesser roadrunner is slightly smaller, not as streaky, and has a smaller bill. They are large long-legged birds with long thick dark bills and long dark tails. Fast on Their Feet: Roadrunners are terrestrial, and although capable of flight, they spend most of their time on the ground. Roadrunners and other members of the cuckoo family have zygodactyl feet (two toes in front and two toes in back). Roadrunners are able to run up to 15 miles per hour and generally prefer sprinting to flying. Greater Roadrunner Habitat: Their breeding habitat is desert and shrubby country in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. They can be seen in the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Oklahoma, Kansas, and rarely in Arkansas and Louisiana. The Roadrunner is the state bird of New Mexico. Diet: Roadrunners are omnivores and are opportunistic. Their diet normally consist of insects (such as grasshoppers, crickets, catepillars, and beetles), small reptiles (such as lizards and snakes, including rattlesnakes), rodents and small mammals, tarantulas, scorpions, centipedes, spiders, small birds and fruits and seeds like prickly pear cactus and sumac. The lesser roadrunner eats mainly insects. Roadrunners forage on the ground usually running after prey under cover, they may leap to catch insects, and commonly batter certain prey, like snakes, against the ground. Baby, it's Cold Outside: During the cold desert night the roadrunner lowers its body temperature slightly, going into a slight torpor to conserve energy. To warm itself during the day, the roadrunner exposes dark patches of skin on its back to the sun. Courtship: Cuckoos are commonly solitary birds or live in pairs. They are monogamous and a pair may mate for life. Pairs may hold a territory all year. During the courtship display, the male bows, alternately lifting and dropping his wings and spreading his tail. He parades in front of the female with his head high and his tail and wings drooped. It has also been documented that the male may bring an offering of food to the female. Roadrunners mate spring to mid-summer depending upon species and geographic location. Nest: Roadrunners nest are often on a platform nest composed of sticks (nest may sometimes contain leaves, snakeskins, or dung). The nest are commonly placed in a low tree, bush, or cactus. Nestlings: Hatching is asynchronous and average a 2-6 egg clutch (the Lesser Roadrunners clutch size is typically smaller). Eggs are generally a white color. Roadrunners have bi-parental care. Both sexes incubate the nest and feed the hatchlings, but males incubate the nest at night. For the first one to two weeks after the young hatch, one parent always remains at the nest. After the hatchlings are two to three weeks old they leave and never return to the nest. For a few day thereafter, the parents and young forage together.

Roadrunners
Roadrunners








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™