Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Poor Devils
Ants on Stilts
Behavior
Eating Troubles
Swine flu goes global
Double take
Birds
Ducks
Songbirds
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Watching out for vultures
The science of disappearing
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Supersight for a Dino King
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
The Taming of the Cat
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Marlin
Flashlight Fishes
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Worms
Starfish
Nautiluses
Mammals
Bumblebee Bats
Scottish Folds
Cocker Spaniels
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Particle Zoo
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Electric Backpack
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Chameleons
Copperhead Snakes
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
No Fat Stars
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Watering the Air
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Roach Love Songs

It's hard to feel romantic around cockroaches, but some male roaches whistle soft music to entice their sweethearts. The whistled sounds are surprisingly complicated and even almost birdlike. The chirps, trills, and squeaks of many insects, including most other kinds of roaches, come from the rubbing of legs or other body parts against each other. Mammals and birds, on the other hand, use their breath to make noises. Hissing cockroaches are among the few insects that communicate this way, too. You may have seen giant hissing cockroaches in pet stores or at insect zoos. When threatened by a predator, hissing cockroaches make loud hisses. Researchers have found that some male roaches also make soft, whispery sounds to get the attention of females. In the new study, researchers from France focused on the songs of a roach species called Elliptorhina chopardi, which are smaller than the giant hissing cockroaches found in pet stores. During the experiment, a male and a female cockroach shared a piece of wood under a dim red light. For 2 hours, the scientists watched and recorded sounds as the male tried to convince the female to mate with him. The recordings included sounds in the air and vibrations traveling through the wood under the roaches' feet. No one has yet studied how E. chopardi hears, but some roaches have "ears" on their legs below the knees. So, it's possible that the creatures can "feel" sounds through the ground. The scientists divided the recorded sounds into three categories: hisses, noisy whistles with static-like fuzz, and complex, pure whistles. The pure whistles sometimes sound like two, intertwined voices. In this case, a roach squirts air through the holes in its abdomen so that it plays two songs at once. That's like having a person with two mouths, each one whistling a different tune. The results showed that males didn't mate unless they made their sweet whistling noises. This finding backs up older research, which found that giant hissing cockroaches, which don't sing, have to make certain sounds to partner up.E. Sohn

Roach Love Songs
Roach Love Songs








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™