Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Salamanders
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
The Science Fair Circuit
Birds
Cranes
Crows
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Flytrap Machine
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Graphene's superstrength
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
Meet your mysterious relative
Digging Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Plastic-munching microbes
Unnatural Disasters
Environment
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Ancient Cave Behavior
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Eels
Mahi-Mahi
Skates
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
How Super Are Superfruits?
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Deep-space dancers
Math of the World
Human Body
Heart Revival
Sun Screen
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Beetles
Wasps
Mammals
Oxen
Flying Foxes
Manatees
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
One ring around them all
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Bright Blooms That Glow
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Asp
Rattlesnakes
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Planning for Mars
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Watering the Air
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Roach Love Songs

It's hard to feel romantic around cockroaches, but some male roaches whistle soft music to entice their sweethearts. The whistled sounds are surprisingly complicated and even almost birdlike. The chirps, trills, and squeaks of many insects, including most other kinds of roaches, come from the rubbing of legs or other body parts against each other. Mammals and birds, on the other hand, use their breath to make noises. Hissing cockroaches are among the few insects that communicate this way, too. You may have seen giant hissing cockroaches in pet stores or at insect zoos. When threatened by a predator, hissing cockroaches make loud hisses. Researchers have found that some male roaches also make soft, whispery sounds to get the attention of females. In the new study, researchers from France focused on the songs of a roach species called Elliptorhina chopardi, which are smaller than the giant hissing cockroaches found in pet stores. During the experiment, a male and a female cockroach shared a piece of wood under a dim red light. For 2 hours, the scientists watched and recorded sounds as the male tried to convince the female to mate with him. The recordings included sounds in the air and vibrations traveling through the wood under the roaches' feet. No one has yet studied how E. chopardi hears, but some roaches have "ears" on their legs below the knees. So, it's possible that the creatures can "feel" sounds through the ground. The scientists divided the recorded sounds into three categories: hisses, noisy whistles with static-like fuzz, and complex, pure whistles. The pure whistles sometimes sound like two, intertwined voices. In this case, a roach squirts air through the holes in its abdomen so that it plays two songs at once. That's like having a person with two mouths, each one whistling a different tune. The results showed that males didn't mate unless they made their sweet whistling noises. This finding backs up older research, which found that giant hissing cockroaches, which don't sing, have to make certain sounds to partner up.E. Sohn

Roach Love Songs
Roach Love Songs








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™