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Silk’s superpowers
Got Milk? How?
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Toads
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Clone Wars
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Gliders in the Family
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The (kids') eyes have it
Math Naturals
Nice Chimps
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Music of the Future
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Flytrap Machine
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New twists for phantom limbs
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet the new dinos
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Earth from the inside out
Springing forward
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Parrotfish
Catfish
Bass
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
The tell-tale bacteria
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Octopuses
Sponges
Hermit Crabs
Mammals
Doberman Pinschers
Tigers
Wildcats
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
One ring around them all
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
A Change in Leaf Color
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Snakes
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Sounds of Titan
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Machine Copy
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
Catching Some Rays
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Remembering Facts and Feelings

Can you describe everything you did last weekend, but you can't remember a thing from last year's social studies class? The difference may be all in your head. New studies pinpoint an inner-brain region called the hippocampus as the root of memory for both experiences and facts. Researchers have disagreed, however, about which kind of information the hippocampus remembers best. In a recent journal, scientists led by Larry R. Squire of the University of California, San Diego, described six adults with hippocampus damage. In one study, the six patients and 14 healthy adults read a list of names-some famous, some made up. The healthy-brained adults were able to pick out the famous people and say which ones were still alive. The brain-damaged patients remembered little about people who became famous after they suffered their injuries or in the 10 years before those injuries. In a second study, the six brain-damaged patients could remember events from their childhood just as well as 25 healthy adults. But personal memories slacked off in the years just before and after their injuries. Together, the two studies suggest that the hippocampus controls memories of both facts and events. The hippocampus may not be essential for kids' ability to remember facts, though. One study of hippocampus-damaged children showed that they could retain new facts well enough to do okay in school. This might be because kids' brains are able to reorganize themselves a lot. Still, no matter how healthy your hippocampus may be, there's no excuse to stop studying for your social studies tests!—E. Sohn

Remembering Facts and Feelings
Remembering Facts and Feelings








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