Agriculture
Watering the Air
Got Milk? How?
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Roach Love Songs
A Tongue and a Half
Behavior
Bringing fish back up to size
Listen and Learn
Internet Generation
Birds
Hummingbirds
Finches
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Supergoo to the rescue
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
A Light Delay
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Recipe for a Hurricane
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Chicken of the Sea
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Piranha
Tiger Sharks
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Symbols from the Stone Age
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Beetles
Krill
Ants
Mammals
Marmots
Weasels and Kin
African Hyenas
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
IceCube Science
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Speedy stars
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Lizards
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
A Smashing Display
Pluto's New Moons
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Reading Body Language

It's natural to greet friends with a smile and a wave. When you do this, your face and body work together to show your friends that you're happy to see them. But what happens if your face and body send mixed messages? Would someone be more likely to believe the look on your face or the way you hold your body? Scientists have recently tackled these questions. They found that when a person is looking at your face, she might not believe what she sees if your body language doesn't match the feeling that your face shows. Studying such mixed messages is nothing new for scientists. Previously, they had found that the tone of a person's voice can be more important than the words that are spoken. For example, most people tend not to believe a person who says in a flat voice, "I'm so excited." When it came to emotions conveyed by facial expressions and body language, most scientists suspected that the face was more important. To test if this was true, psychologists from the Netherlands and Boston showed people a number of pictures of isolated faces and isolated bodies (with faces blurred out) that showed anger or fear. They also showed pictures in which angry or scared faces were paired with angry or scared bodies. An angry face had low eyebrows and tight lips. A scared face had high eyebrows and a slightly open mouth. An angry body had arms back and shoulders at an angle, as if ready to fight. A scared body had arms forward and shoulders square, as if ready to defend. Using the pictures, the researchers asked people to quickly press a button that matched the correct facial emotion: anger or fear. When people looked only at faces, they chose the right emotion about 81 percent of the time. But when people looked at a mismatched picture—a scared face with an angry body, for example—they correctly guessed the emotion on the face only 64 percent of the time. These results told the researchers that mixed signals can confuse people. Even when people pay attention to the face, body language subtly influences which emotion they read. So, your body language is important for telling people how you feel. And if you want to be understood, it helps to avoid sending mixed messages.—K. Greene

Reading Body Language
Reading Body Language








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™