Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Behavior
Pain Expectations
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Birds
Pelicans
Geese
Emus
Chemistry and Materials
Small but WISE
Graphene's superstrength
Atom Hauler
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Middle school science adventures
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
Meet your mysterious relative
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Wave of Destruction
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Stone Age Sole Survivors
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Hagfish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Packing Fat
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Moths
Leeches
Sponges
Mammals
Dolphins
African Ostrich
Beagles
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Caimans
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
A Moon's Icy Spray
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Shape Shifting
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Sizes and Scales: The Northern Quoll is the smallest of the four Australian quoll species. Females are smaller than males with adult females weighing between 350-690g and adult males 540-1120g. Head and body length ranges from 270-370mm (adult males) to 249-310 (adult females). Tail length ranges between 202-345mm. Single Mothers: A remarkable feature of this species is that the males show complete die-off after mating, leaving the females to raise the young alone. What's For Dinner? Northern Quolls feed primarily on invertebrates, but also consume fleshy fruit, and a wide range of vertebrates including small mammals, birds, lizards, snakes and frogs. They also scavenge on road-kills, around campsites and in garbage tins. Just the Facts: Females have six to eight nipples and develop a pouch—which opens towards the tail—only during the breeding season, when they are rearing young. Quolls live both in forests and in open valley land. Though primarily ground-dwelling, they have developed secondary arboreal characteristics. Their molars and canines are strongly developed. GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 The Tiger Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), also known as the Spotted-tail Quoll and the Spotted Quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial mammal, native to Australia. It is mainland Australia's largest carnivorous marsupial. Weight and Measures: The Tiger Quoll ranges from 35 to 75 cm in length and has a tail of about 34 to 50 cm. Females are smaller than the males: while females grow to four kilograms, males can reach up to 7 kg. Quolls have thick, soft fawn, brown or black fur. Small white spots cover the body except for the bushy tail, which may have a white tip. A Day in the Life: Quolls feed on a large range of prey including birds, rats and other marsupials, small reptiles and insects. They are good climbers but spend most of their time on the forest floor. Although nocturnal, they spend the daylight hours basking in the sun. They nest in rocky banks, hollow logs or small caves. They produce one litter a year with four to six young. The gestation period is 21 days. The young remain in their mother's pouch for about seven weeks, and it takes some 18 weeks for them to become independent of the mother. Sexual maturity is reached after one year. Tiger Quolls can get 4 to 5 years old.










Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™