Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Tongue and a Half
Ants on Stilts
Lives of a Mole Rat
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Bringing fish back up to size
Brainy bees know two from three
Birds
Backyard Birds
Hummingbirds
Roadrunners
Chemistry and Materials
Boosting Fuel Cells
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Computers
The science of disappearing
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Middle school science adventures
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Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Missing Tigers in India
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Hammerhead Sharks
Eels
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
How Super Are Superfruits?
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
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GSAT Scholarship
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
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GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
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Human Body
Hey batter, wake up!
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Sun Screen
Invertebrates
Invertebrates
Giant Clam
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Felines
Miniature Schnauzers
Dogs
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Project Music
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Lizards
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
Black Holes That Burp
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Reach for the Sky
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Watering the Air
Recipe for a Hurricane
Arctic Melt
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Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Sizes and Scales: The Northern Quoll is the smallest of the four Australian quoll species. Females are smaller than males with adult females weighing between 350-690g and adult males 540-1120g. Head and body length ranges from 270-370mm (adult males) to 249-310 (adult females). Tail length ranges between 202-345mm. Single Mothers: A remarkable feature of this species is that the males show complete die-off after mating, leaving the females to raise the young alone. What's For Dinner? Northern Quolls feed primarily on invertebrates, but also consume fleshy fruit, and a wide range of vertebrates including small mammals, birds, lizards, snakes and frogs. They also scavenge on road-kills, around campsites and in garbage tins. Just the Facts: Females have six to eight nipples and develop a pouch—which opens towards the tail—only during the breeding season, when they are rearing young. Quolls live both in forests and in open valley land. Though primarily ground-dwelling, they have developed secondary arboreal characteristics. Their molars and canines are strongly developed. GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 The Tiger Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), also known as the Spotted-tail Quoll and the Spotted Quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial mammal, native to Australia. It is mainland Australia's largest carnivorous marsupial. Weight and Measures: The Tiger Quoll ranges from 35 to 75 cm in length and has a tail of about 34 to 50 cm. Females are smaller than the males: while females grow to four kilograms, males can reach up to 7 kg. Quolls have thick, soft fawn, brown or black fur. Small white spots cover the body except for the bushy tail, which may have a white tip. A Day in the Life: Quolls feed on a large range of prey including birds, rats and other marsupials, small reptiles and insects. They are good climbers but spend most of their time on the forest floor. Although nocturnal, they spend the daylight hours basking in the sun. They nest in rocky banks, hollow logs or small caves. They produce one litter a year with four to six young. The gestation period is 21 days. The young remain in their mother's pouch for about seven weeks, and it takes some 18 weeks for them to become independent of the mother. Sexual maturity is reached after one year. Tiger Quolls can get 4 to 5 years old.










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