Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Getting the dirt on carbon
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Salamanders
Animals
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Walktopus
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Behavior
Face values
Eating Troubles
Girls are cool for school
Birds
Flightless Birds
Seagulls
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Atom Hauler
Diamond Glow
Atomic Drive
Computers
Music of the Future
Hubble trouble doubled
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Shrinking Glaciers
Environment
A Change in Time
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Watching deep-space fireworks
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The mercury in that tuna
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Arachnids
Oysters
Mammals
Quokkas
Bison
Aardvarks
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
One ring around them all
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Caimans
Boa Constrictors
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Pluto's New Moons
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Shape Shifting
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Earth's Poles in Peril
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Quokkas

The Quokka (Setonix brachyurus) is a small macropod, about the size of a large domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the Quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 Just the Facts: Quokkas are the only member of the genus Setonix. They are 40 to 54 cm long with a 25 to 30 cm tail which is rather short for a macropod. They have a stocky build, rounded ears, and a short, broad head. Although looking rather like a very small, dumpy kangaroo, they can climb small trees and shrubs. Their coarse fur is a grizzled brown color, fading to buff underneath. Vulnerable Species: In the wild, it is now restricted to a very small range in mainland south-western Western Australia, where it has become rare, and on two cat-free and fox-free islands off the coast: Bald Island and Rottnest Island which is its stronghold. On Rottnest it is common and occupies a wide range of habitats, ranging from semi-arid scrub to cultivated gardens. Although numerous on the small offshore islands, they have a very restricted range and are classified as vulnerable. On the mainland, where they must contend with introduced foxes and cats, they require dense ground cover for refuge. Social Lives: Quokkas are gregarious and gather in large groups where food is available: primary items are grasses, sedges, succulents and foliage. They breed at any time on the mainland, but in late summer on Rottnest. Quokkas only produce a single joey in a year. Restricted availability of the trace element copper appears to be a major limiting factor of the ability of Quokkas to breed on Rottnest. Rats and Cats: Quokkas were one of the first Australian mammals seen by Europeans. The Dutch mariner Samuel Volckertzoon wrote of sighting "a wild cat" on Rottnest Island in 1658. In 1696 Willem de Vlamingh mistook them for rats and named the island "Rottenest", Dutch for "rat nest".

Quokkas
Quokkas








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™