Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Living in the Desert
Firefly Delight
Deep Krill
Behavior
Talking with Hands
A brain-boosting video game
Girls are cool for school
Birds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Condors
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Troubles with Hubble
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Whale Watch
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Carp
Halibut
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
A Taste for Cheese
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math Naturals
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Snails
Sponges
Octopuses
Mammals
Gazelle
Wombats
Chipmunks
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Invisibility Ring
Electric Backpack
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Nature's Alphabet
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Chameleons
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
A Whole Lot of Nothing
A Moon's Icy Spray
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Reach for the Sky
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Charged cars that would charge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Change in Climate
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Quick Quake Alerts

The ground shakes. Dishes fall off shelves. Houses collapse. Cars topple over bridges. Every year, earthquakes destroy homes and schools, and they kill many thousands of people around the world. Even scarier, it's impossible to know exactly when and where the next one will strike. A system of detectors in Los Angeles might be able to warn that an earthquake is coming, according to a new analysis. Even if the alarm comes only a few seconds before the quake, the system could save lives. Earthquakes cause a few different kinds of underground vibrations. One kind are called P waves, which travel quickly through Earth and rarely cause damage. The S waves that follow are more dangerous. They travel half as fast and shake the ground from side to side. Richard M. Allen of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his colleagues analyzed ground motions from 53 fairly strong earthquakes that have struck Los Angeles since 1995. By looking at the first few seconds of a quake’s P wave, they found they could predict how big the oncoming S wave would be. Using detectors already in place throughout Los Angeles could give residents at least a few seconds warning that a quake is coming, Allen suggests. That wouldn’t be enough time to run away. But a siren or Internet message could save lives by giving people time to shut off power and stop trains. Kids in school could dive under their desks. The system wouldn’t make earthquakes any less scary, but at least you’d know what was coming!—E. Sohn

Quick Quake Alerts
Quick Quake Alerts








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