Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Watering the Air
Poison Dart Frogs
A Meal Plan for Birds
Deep Krill
Missing Moose
Listening to Birdsong
Surprise Visitor
Monkeys in the Mirror
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Diamond Glow
The memory of a material
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
A Dire Shortage of Water
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Plastic Meals for Seals
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
An Ancient Childhood
Pygmy Sharks
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Making good, brown fat
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense:
Math Naturals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Heavy Sleep
Hermit Crabs
African Leopards
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Speedy stars
Road Bumps
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Bright Blooms That Glow
Fastest Plant on Earth
Boa Constrictors
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Supersuits for Superheroes
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Quick Quake Alerts

The ground shakes. Dishes fall off shelves. Houses collapse. Cars topple over bridges. Every year, earthquakes destroy homes and schools, and they kill many thousands of people around the world. Even scarier, it's impossible to know exactly when and where the next one will strike. A system of detectors in Los Angeles might be able to warn that an earthquake is coming, according to a new analysis. Even if the alarm comes only a few seconds before the quake, the system could save lives. Earthquakes cause a few different kinds of underground vibrations. One kind are called P waves, which travel quickly through Earth and rarely cause damage. The S waves that follow are more dangerous. They travel half as fast and shake the ground from side to side. Richard M. Allen of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his colleagues analyzed ground motions from 53 fairly strong earthquakes that have struck Los Angeles since 1995. By looking at the first few seconds of a quake’s P wave, they found they could predict how big the oncoming S wave would be. Using detectors already in place throughout Los Angeles could give residents at least a few seconds warning that a quake is coming, Allen suggests. That wouldn’t be enough time to run away. But a siren or Internet message could save lives by giving people time to shut off power and stop trains. Kids in school could dive under their desks. The system wouldn’t make earthquakes any less scary, but at least you’d know what was coming!—E. Sohn

Quick Quake Alerts
Quick Quake Alerts

Designed and Powered by™