Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Silk’s superpowers
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
New Elephant-Shrew
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Birds
Finches
Nightingales
Cassowaries
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
Spinning Clay into Cotton
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Computers
Play for Science
A Light Delay
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Fingerprinting Fossils
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Watering the Air
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Untangling Human Origins
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
Seahorses
Tilapia
Carp
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
A Taste for Cheese
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Foul Play?
Cell Phone Tattlers
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Tarantula
Insects
Mammals
Bison
African Mammals
African Leopards
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
One ring around them all
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Reptiles
Chameleons
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Reach for the Sky
Middle school science adventures
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Pygmy Sharks

The pygmy shark (Euprotomicrus bispinatus), the smallest of all the shark species, is a sleeper shark of the Dalatiinae subfamily. It is found in subtropical and warm temperate oceans worldwide, from the surface to depths of 1,800 metres. Their length is up to about 27 centimetres for females and about 22 centimetres for males. The pygmy shark has a large head and underslung jaw, strangely shaped caudal fin, and a very small first dorsal fin set far back on the body. They have no spines in front of the dorsal fins. The colour is black with a slightly paler belly and white borders to the fins. The lower body is luminescent, which is thought to help in disguising the fish's dark silhouette from upward-looking predators below. Pygmy sharks undertake vertical migrations from the lower levels of their depth range to the surface each night. They are following the deep-water crustaceans, squids, and bony fish, which also rise at the same time to feed on surface plankton in comparative safety. Reproduction is ovoviviparous, meaning that they produce eggs that develop inside the mother's body and hatch immediately after their release from the parent. A female pygmy shark produces about 8 young in a litter.

Pygmy Sharks
Pygmy Sharks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™