Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
Puberty gone wild
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Fish needs see-through head
Birds
Hummingbirds
Roadrunners
Turkeys
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Flytrap Machine
Picture the Smell
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Galaxies on the go
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Middle school science adventures
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Deep History
Environment
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
The Birds are Falling
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
A Long Trek to Asia
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Bull Sharks
Sting Ray
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Symbols from the Stone Age
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math Naturals
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
The tell-tale bacteria
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Starfish
Roundworms
Mammals
Primates
Echidnas
Sperm Whale
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Cobras
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Roving the Red Planet
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Beyond Bar Codes
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Where rivers run uphill
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Putting a Mouse on Pause

Do you hate cold winters, or do you have a tough week coming up? Someday, you might be able to hibernate through them! Scientists have found a way to bring breathing and heart rate nearly to a standstill in mice without killing them. It doesn't even seem to harm the mice. This is the first time that scientists have induced a state of "suspended animation" in a mammal that doesn't normally go into such a state on its own. Some animals regularly slow down their metabolic rates, or the speed at which their bodies function. Every day, for example, certain types of hummingbirds go into a state called torpor. Their heart rates drop, breathing slows, and body temperature plunges. Animals such as bears go into a similar type of hibernation for entire seasons. Scientists would love to find a way to put people into a state of torpor. Suspended animation could offer protection after a heart attack or stroke, and it could help people survive while waiting for an organ transplant. Previously, scientists had used a type of gas called hydrogen sulfide to induce torpor in yeast, worms, and flies. Mark Roth and his coworkers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle tried the same thing with common lab mice. These mice don't normally show any type of hibernation behavior. The researchers put mice in chambers containing low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide. The gas smells like rotten eggs. Within minutes of breathing it in, the mice stopped moving and seemed unconscious. Over then next 6 hours, their breathing rate dropped from 120 breaths per minute to fewer than 10. Their body temperatures, usually a toasty 37 degrees C (98.6 degrees F), fell in some cases to as low as 11 degrees C (51.8 degrees F). When the mice were able to breathe normal air again, their breathing rates and body temperatures went back up to normal. Tests showed no lasting damage. The scientists speculate that hydrogen sulfide works by substituting for oxygen inside the parts of cells that produce energy. The study might help explain how natural hibernators kick-start their winter rest. However, only future research will tell whether people can be put into a state resembling hibernation.—E. Sohn

Putting a Mouse on Pause
Putting a Mouse on Pause








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™