Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Not Slippery When Wet
Roach Love Songs
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Behavior
Making light of sleep
Surprise Visitor
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Parakeets
Vultures
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Earth from the inside out
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
Fossil Forests
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Springing forward
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Bald Eagles Forever
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Sturgeons
Skates
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Recipe for Health
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Math of the World
Math Naturals
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Hear, Hear
Germ Zapper
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Giant Squid
Nautiluses
Mammals
Cocker Spaniels
Baboons
Blue Whales
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Farms sprout in cities
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Asp
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Cousin Earth
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Pugs

A Pug is a toy dog breed of dog with a wrinkly face, medium-small body. The word "Pug" may have derived from the Latin pugnus (fist). Or, in nod to the breeds sometimes mischievous nature, from the character "Puck" of A Midsummer Night's Dream. The breed is often summarized as multum in parvo, which implies "a lot (of dog) in a small space". Short & Compact: While most Pugs appearing in eighteenth century prints tended to be long and lean, the current breed standards call for a square, cobby body, a compact form, deep chest, and well-developed muscle. Their heads, carried on arched necks, should be substantial and round, the better to accentuate their large, dark eyes. The wrinkles on their foreheads should be distinct and deep, and were especially prized by the Chinese as they seemed to spell out the character for "prince". Their fine, glossy coats can be apricot, fawn, silver or black. The tail should curl tightly over the hip; a double curl is considered perfection. A Little Impish: Pugs are very sociable dogs, but quite stubborn. They are playful, charming, clever; and are known to succeed in dog obedience skills. Pugs are sensitive to the tone of a human, so harsh punishment is generally unnecessary. Pugs get along well with other dogs and pets and require lots of attention; they may become slightly jealous if their owner ignores them or does not play with them. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License". Breathe Easy: Because they have extremely short snouts and no skeletal brow ridges, Pugs can easily scratch their corneas accidentally. Their short noses can also cause them to develop breathing problems. They are prone to obesity, so they can quickly reach unhealthy weights; it is therefore important for Pug owners to make sure their pets get regular exercise. Due to their short snouts, Pugs are vulnerable to temperature extremes. It is important to make sure that they do not overheat in hot weather, and likewise they should not be left outside in cold weather. Pugs can also suffer from a chronic form of granulomatous meningoencephalitis (an inflammation of the brain) specific to the breed called Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE). There is no known cause or cure for PDE, although it is believed to be an inherited disease. All dogs either die or are euthanasized within a few months after the onset of clinical signs. Pugs are expected to live from about 12 to 15 years. Of Royal Lineage: Bred to adorn the laps of the Chinese emperors during the Shang dynasty (1766-1122 BC), in East China, where they were known as Lo-Chiang-Sze or Foo (ceramic foos, transmogrified into dragons, with their bulging eyes are very Pug-like). The Pugs popularity spread to Tibet, where they were kept by monks, and then went onto Japan, and finally Europe. Shipping Dogs: The breed was first imported in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries by merchants and crews from the Dutch East Indies Trading Company. The Pug later became the official dog of the House of Orange, and traveled with William III and Mary II when they left the Netherlands to ascend to the throne in 1688. This century also saw Pugs' popularity on the rise in other European countries. In Spain, they were painted by Goya, in Italy Pugs dressed in matching jackets and pantaloons sat by the coachmen of the rich, and in Germany and France Pugs appear several times as footnotes to history. Napoleon Complex: The popularity of the Pug continued to spread in France during the eighteenth century. Before her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte, Joséphine utilized her Pug "Fortune" to carry concealed messages to her family while she was confined at Les Carmes prison as the pet was the only recipient of visiting rights. In nineteenth century England, Pugs flourished under the patronage of the monarch Queen Victoria. Her many Pugs, which she bred herself, had such names as Olga, Pedro, Minka, Fatima and Venus. Her involvement with the dogs in general helped to establish the Kennel Club, which was formed in 1873. Victoria favored fawn and apricot Pugs, whereas the aristocrat Lady Brassey is credited with making black Pugs fashionable after she brought some back from China in 1886. The Pug has also thrived in democratic circles, arriving in the United States sometime in the nineteenth century (the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885) and was soon making its way into the family home and show ring.

Pugs
Pugs








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™