Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Sleepless at Sea
Cool Penguins
Color-Changing Bugs
Behavior
Face values
Lightening Your Mood
Mind-reading Machine
Birds
Ducks
Falcons
Tropical Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
The memory of a material
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Computers
The Book of Life
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Unnatural Disasters
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Alien Invasions
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Oldest Writing in the New World
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Halibut
Sharks
Swordfish
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
It's a Math World for Animals
Play for Science
Human Body
Heavy Sleep
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Crabs
Giant Clam
Mammals
Tasmanian Devil
Antelope
Elephants
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Dreams of Floating in Space
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Springing forward
Making the most of a meal
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Anacondas
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Ringing Saturn
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Recipe for a Hurricane
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease

Chomping at a juicy hamburger might be a little less tempting than it once seemed. It took just one case of mad cow disease, discovered in December, to make several countries ban imports of U.S. beef. Officials in Japan and elsewhere are afraid that people may eat infected meat and develop the human version of mad cow disease.

Mad cow disease gets its name because cattle infected with it behave strangely. They seem nervous and distressed. They can’t stand or walk properly.

These symptoms are caused by the breakdown of the animal’s nervous system. Deformed proteins, known as prions, multiply and worm their way through an infected cow’s brain and nerves, making the tissue look like a sponge.

These prions have a similar effect in people. They can cause the fatal human disease known as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Eating infected beef is the only known way for the prions to go from a cow to a person.

Consuming infected meat is also the main way prions are transferred from one cow to another. This can happen because of an old method of producing food for cows. When cows were slaughtered for their meat and hides, some of their remains—including their brains, eyes, spinal cords, and intestines—used to be processed to make animal feed containing protein.

This type of feed was banned in 1997 when scientists realized that it was responsible for the spread of mad cow disease.

Christl Donnelly of Imperial College in London says that as long as the ban on this type of feed is enforced, mad cow disease shouldn’t spread in the United States. This means it’s also highly unlikely the disease would spread to people.

Officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are taking an extra precaution. They’re planning on tracking every cow that will be used for beef, from its birth until it ends up in the grocery store.—S. McDonagh

 

Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™