Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Springing forward
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Behavior
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
A brain-boosting video game
Math Naturals
Birds
Roadrunners
Songbirds
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Spinning Clay into Cotton
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Music of the Future
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Dino-bite!
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
The Birds are Falling
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Perches
Dogfish
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
The mercury in that tuna
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math of the World
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Sea Anemones
Crabs
Mammals
Prairie Dogs
Hares
Weasels and Kin
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Getting the dirt on carbon
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Snakes
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
A Planet from the Early Universe
A Family in Space
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Where rivers run uphill
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Arctic Melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Pronouns

Definition:

A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Pronouns can be in one of three cases: Subject, Object, or Possessive.

Rule 1

Subject pronouns are used when the pronoun is the subject of the sentence. You can remember subject pronouns easily by filling in the blank subject space for a simple sentence.

Example:
______ did the job.
I, you, he, she, it, we, and they all fit into the blank and are, therefore, subject pronouns.

Rule 2

Subject pronouns are also used if they rename the subject. They follow to be verbs such asis, are, was, were, am, and will be.

Examples:
It is he.
This is she speaking.
It is we who are responsible for the decision to downsize.

NOTE: In spoken English, most people tend to follow to be verbs with object pronouns. Many English teachers support (or at least have given in to) this distinction between written and spoken English.

Example:
It could have been them.

Better:
It could have been they.

Example:
It is just me at the door.

Better:
It is just I at the door.

Rule 3

Object pronouns are used everywhere else (direct object, indirect object, object of the preposition). Object pronouns are me, you, him, her, it, us, and them.

Examples:
Jean talked to him.
Are you talking to me?

To be able to choose pronouns correctly, you must learn to identify clauses. A clause is a group of words containing a verb and subject.

Rule 4a

A strong clause can stand on its own.

Examples:
She is hungry.
I am feeling well today.

Rule 4b

A weak clause begins with words such as although, since, if, when, and because. Weak clauses cannot stand on their own.

Examples:
Although she is hungry...
If she is hungry...
Since I am feeling well...

Rule 4c

If a sentence contains more than one clause, isolate the clauses so that you can decide which pronoun is correct.

Examples:

Weak

Strong

[Although she is hungry,]

[she will give him some of her food.]

[Although this gift is for him,]

[I would like you to have it too.]

Rule 5

To decide whether to use the subject or object pronoun after the words than or as, mentally complete the sentence.

Examples:
Tranh is as smart as she/her.
If we mentally complete the sentence, we would say, "Tranh is as smart as she is." Therefore, she is the correct answer.

Zoe is taller than I/me.
Mentally completing the sentence, we have, "Zoe is taller than I am."

Daniel would rather talk to her than I/me.
We can mentally complete this sentence in two ways: "Daniel would rather talk to her than to me." OR "Daniel would rather talk to her than I would." As you can see, the meaning will change depending on the pronoun you choose.

Rule 6

Possessive pronouns show ownership and never need apostrophes.
Possessive pronouns: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs

NOTE: The only time it's has an apostrophe is when it is a contraction for it is or it has.

Examples:
It's a cold morning.
The thermometer reached its highest reading.

Rule 7

Reflexive pronouns - myself, himself, herself, itself, themselves, ourselves, yourself, yourselves- should be used only when they refer back to another word in the sentence.

Correct:
I worked myself to the bone.

Incorrect:
My brother and myself did it.
The word myself does not refer back to another word.

Correct:
My brother and I did it.

Incorrect:
Please give it to John or myself.

Correct:
Please give it to John or me.

I need more understanding


I'm ready for the quiz

Pronouns









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™