Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Fishing for Giant Squid
How to Fly Like a Bat
Behavior
Baby Number Whizzes
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Birds
Parrots
Tropical Birds
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
The metal detector in your mouth
Lighting goes digital
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Getting in Touch with Touch
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
A Dino King's Ancestor
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Missing Tigers in India
The Birds are Falling
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Electric Eel
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Chew for Health
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Spit Power
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Arachnids
Corals
Mammals
Canines
Horses
Blue Whales
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Springing forward
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Caimans
Geckos
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Pronouns

Definition:

A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Pronouns can be in one of three cases: Subject, Object, or Possessive.

Rule 1

Subject pronouns are used when the pronoun is the subject of the sentence. You can remember subject pronouns easily by filling in the blank subject space for a simple sentence.

Example:
______ did the job.
I, you, he, she, it, we, and they all fit into the blank and are, therefore, subject pronouns.

Rule 2

Subject pronouns are also used if they rename the subject. They follow to be verbs such asis, are, was, were, am, and will be.

Examples:
It is he.
This is she speaking.
It is we who are responsible for the decision to downsize.

NOTE: In spoken English, most people tend to follow to be verbs with object pronouns. Many English teachers support (or at least have given in to) this distinction between written and spoken English.

Example:
It could have been them.

Better:
It could have been they.

Example:
It is just me at the door.

Better:
It is just I at the door.

Rule 3

Object pronouns are used everywhere else (direct object, indirect object, object of the preposition). Object pronouns are me, you, him, her, it, us, and them.

Examples:
Jean talked to him.
Are you talking to me?

To be able to choose pronouns correctly, you must learn to identify clauses. A clause is a group of words containing a verb and subject.

Rule 4a

A strong clause can stand on its own.

Examples:
She is hungry.
I am feeling well today.

Rule 4b

A weak clause begins with words such as although, since, if, when, and because. Weak clauses cannot stand on their own.

Examples:
Although she is hungry...
If she is hungry...
Since I am feeling well...

Rule 4c

If a sentence contains more than one clause, isolate the clauses so that you can decide which pronoun is correct.

Examples:

Weak

Strong

[Although she is hungry,]

[she will give him some of her food.]

[Although this gift is for him,]

[I would like you to have it too.]

Rule 5

To decide whether to use the subject or object pronoun after the words than or as, mentally complete the sentence.

Examples:
Tranh is as smart as she/her.
If we mentally complete the sentence, we would say, "Tranh is as smart as she is." Therefore, she is the correct answer.

Zoe is taller than I/me.
Mentally completing the sentence, we have, "Zoe is taller than I am."

Daniel would rather talk to her than I/me.
We can mentally complete this sentence in two ways: "Daniel would rather talk to her than to me." OR "Daniel would rather talk to her than I would." As you can see, the meaning will change depending on the pronoun you choose.

Rule 6

Possessive pronouns show ownership and never need apostrophes.
Possessive pronouns: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs

NOTE: The only time it's has an apostrophe is when it is a contraction for it is or it has.

Examples:
It's a cold morning.
The thermometer reached its highest reading.

Rule 7

Reflexive pronouns - myself, himself, herself, itself, themselves, ourselves, yourself, yourselves- should be used only when they refer back to another word in the sentence.

Correct:
I worked myself to the bone.

Incorrect:
My brother and myself did it.
The word myself does not refer back to another word.

Correct:
My brother and I did it.

Incorrect:
Please give it to John or myself.

Correct:
Please give it to John or me.

I need more understanding


I'm ready for the quiz

Pronouns









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™