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Worlds largest lizard is venomous too
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Look into My Eyes
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Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Earth Rocks On
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Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Little People Cause Big Surprise
Salt and Early Civilization
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Detecting True Art
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Play for Science
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Kodiak Bear
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Particle Zoo
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
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Springing forward
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Seeds of the Future
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Roving the Red Planet
A Family in Space
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
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Shape Shifting
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Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
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Robots on the Road, Again
Troubles with Hubble
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Prime Time for Broken Bones

Kids will be kids. They climb trees. They ride skateboards down steps. They jump off swing-sets. No matter how often adults warn them to be careful, accidents occur and bones break. That's happened generation after generation. There's a new reason now to pay attention to warnings, however. A recent study found that young people today are breaking their forearms far more often than kids did just 30 years ago. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., looked at medical records from the Rochester area during two 3-year blocks: 19681971 and 19982001. Overall, there were 42 percent more forearm fractures during the more recent period. The study included people up to age 35, but most breaks happened between ages 10 and 16. Breaks during sports and other recreational activities increased the most, doubling over the 30-year period. In males, there was a sharp increase in fracture-inducing accidents during inline skating, skateboarding, skiing, hockey, and bicycling. Females broke significantly more bones from skating, skiing, soccer, and basketball. Kids might be more active than they used to be, which is one possible explanation for the trend. Diet could be another reason. More young people today drink soda and sweetened juices instead of calcium-rich milk. Calcium helps build strong bones. At the same time, the inactive lifestyle of some kids may also contribute to the problem. Today's kids may be more out of shape from too much time spent playing video games, watching TV, and snacking. When they go out to play, they may be more likely to fall and break a limb. So, when you go out to play, consider wearing a helmet and other protective gear. At dinner, make sure you eat enough calcium. And it might make sense to listen to adults when they tell you to watch out.E. Sohn

Prime Time for Broken Bones
Prime Time for Broken Bones








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