Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Animals
Awake at Night
Cool Penguins
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Behavior
A Recipe for Happiness
Babies Prove Sound Learners
The Science Fair Circuit
Birds
Peafowl
Woodpecker
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Graphene's superstrength
A Light Delay
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
A Big, Weird Dino
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Coral Gardens
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Blooming Jellies
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Catching Some Rays
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Words of the Distant Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Sturgeons
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Building a Food Pyramid
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
A Long Haul
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Nautiluses
Insects
Mammals
Bats
Marmots
African Gorillas
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
How children learn
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Stalking Plants by Scent
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Snakes
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Supersuits for Superheroes
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Where rivers run uphill
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Prime Time for Broken Bones

Kids will be kids. They climb trees. They ride skateboards down steps. They jump off swing-sets. No matter how often adults warn them to be careful, accidents occur and bones break. That's happened generation after generation. There's a new reason now to pay attention to warnings, however. A recent study found that young people today are breaking their forearms far more often than kids did just 30 years ago. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., looked at medical records from the Rochester area during two 3-year blocks: 1968–1971 and 1998–2001. Overall, there were 42 percent more forearm fractures during the more recent period. The study included people up to age 35, but most breaks happened between ages 10 and 16. Breaks during sports and other recreational activities increased the most, doubling over the 30-year period. In males, there was a sharp increase in fracture-inducing accidents during inline skating, skateboarding, skiing, hockey, and bicycling. Females broke significantly more bones from skating, skiing, soccer, and basketball. Kids might be more active than they used to be, which is one possible explanation for the trend. Diet could be another reason. More young people today drink soda and sweetened juices instead of calcium-rich milk. Calcium helps build strong bones. At the same time, the inactive lifestyle of some kids may also contribute to the problem. Today's kids may be more out of shape from too much time spent playing video games, watching TV, and snacking. When they go out to play, they may be more likely to fall and break a limb. So, when you go out to play, consider wearing a helmet and other protective gear. At dinner, make sure you eat enough calcium. And it might make sense to listen to adults when they tell you to watch out.—E. Sohn

Prime Time for Broken Bones
Prime Time for Broken Bones








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™