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Heaviest named element is official
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Earth's Poles in Peril
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When Fungi and Algae Marry
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
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Little People Cause Big Surprise
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Eat Out, Eat Smart
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Who vs. Whom
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GSAT Exam Preparation
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
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Black Hole Journey
Extra Strings for New Sounds
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Seeds of the Future
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Getting the dirt on carbon
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Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
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Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Machine Copy
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
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What is a Verb?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Charged cars that would charge
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
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Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Watering the Air
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Prime Time for Broken Bones

Kids will be kids. They climb trees. They ride skateboards down steps. They jump off swing-sets. No matter how often adults warn them to be careful, accidents occur and bones break. That's happened generation after generation. There's a new reason now to pay attention to warnings, however. A recent study found that young people today are breaking their forearms far more often than kids did just 30 years ago. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., looked at medical records from the Rochester area during two 3-year blocks: 19681971 and 19982001. Overall, there were 42 percent more forearm fractures during the more recent period. The study included people up to age 35, but most breaks happened between ages 10 and 16. Breaks during sports and other recreational activities increased the most, doubling over the 30-year period. In males, there was a sharp increase in fracture-inducing accidents during inline skating, skateboarding, skiing, hockey, and bicycling. Females broke significantly more bones from skating, skiing, soccer, and basketball. Kids might be more active than they used to be, which is one possible explanation for the trend. Diet could be another reason. More young people today drink soda and sweetened juices instead of calcium-rich milk. Calcium helps build strong bones. At the same time, the inactive lifestyle of some kids may also contribute to the problem. Today's kids may be more out of shape from too much time spent playing video games, watching TV, and snacking. When they go out to play, they may be more likely to fall and break a limb. So, when you go out to play, consider wearing a helmet and other protective gear. At dinner, make sure you eat enough calcium. And it might make sense to listen to adults when they tell you to watch out.E. Sohn

Prime Time for Broken Bones
Prime Time for Broken Bones








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