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Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
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Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
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In Search of the Perfect French Fry
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Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
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Whoever vs. Whomever
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Deep-space dancers
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math is a real brain bender
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Foul Play?
A Fix for Injured Knees
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
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African Zebra
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
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The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Gaining a Swift Lift
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The algae invasion
A Change in Leaf Color
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Asp
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Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Baby Star
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
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Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Bionic Bacteria
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
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Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Prime Time for Broken Bones

Kids will be kids. They climb trees. They ride skateboards down steps. They jump off swing-sets. No matter how often adults warn them to be careful, accidents occur and bones break. That's happened generation after generation. There's a new reason now to pay attention to warnings, however. A recent study found that young people today are breaking their forearms far more often than kids did just 30 years ago. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., looked at medical records from the Rochester area during two 3-year blocks: 19681971 and 19982001. Overall, there were 42 percent more forearm fractures during the more recent period. The study included people up to age 35, but most breaks happened between ages 10 and 16. Breaks during sports and other recreational activities increased the most, doubling over the 30-year period. In males, there was a sharp increase in fracture-inducing accidents during inline skating, skateboarding, skiing, hockey, and bicycling. Females broke significantly more bones from skating, skiing, soccer, and basketball. Kids might be more active than they used to be, which is one possible explanation for the trend. Diet could be another reason. More young people today drink soda and sweetened juices instead of calcium-rich milk. Calcium helps build strong bones. At the same time, the inactive lifestyle of some kids may also contribute to the problem. Today's kids may be more out of shape from too much time spent playing video games, watching TV, and snacking. When they go out to play, they may be more likely to fall and break a limb. So, when you go out to play, consider wearing a helmet and other protective gear. At dinner, make sure you eat enough calcium. And it might make sense to listen to adults when they tell you to watch out.E. Sohn

Prime Time for Broken Bones
Prime Time for Broken Bones








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