Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Springing forward
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Polar Bears in Trouble
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Dino-bite!
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Birds
Swifts
Peafowl
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
Music of the Future
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The Book of Life
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Middle school science adventures
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Pollution Detective
Whale Watch
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Fakes in the museum
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Carp
Sturgeons
Hammerhead Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Packing Fat
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Moths
Bees
Tapeworms
Mammals
Chinchillas
Gray Whale
Marmots
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Speedy stars
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Stalking Plants by Scent
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Anacondas
Snapping Turtles
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
A Great Ball of Fire
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Smart Windows
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist

Going to the dentist has a much longer history than you might imagine. Researchers recently unearthed what may be the earliest examples of ancient dentistry yet discovered—holes drilled in teeth that are between 9,000 and 7,500 years old. The teeth come from a prehistoric farming village called Mehrgarh in what is now Pakistan. A total of 11 teeth from nine adults contained drilled holes, the researchers report. Cavities caused by tooth decay can be painful. If untreated, decaying teeth will eventually rot away or fall out. Dentists today use power drills with metal tips to scour out cavities and prevent decay from spreading. Mehrgarh dentists probably used tools made from flint. These ancient people already used sharpened flint attached to wooden rods to drill holes for making beads out of pieces of shell, turquoise, and other materials. It wouldn't have been hard for them to use the same skills to drill teeth. Drilled holes in the Mehrgarh teeth are between 1.3 and 3.2 millimeters wide and between 0.5 and 3.5 millimeters deep. The edges are smooth, which suggests that patients were alive when the holes were drilled and remained alive for a long time afterwards, because chewing continued to wear down their teeth. Researchers aren't yet sure whether some type of filling once plugged the holes. The holes were probably not made for decoration or display because the teeth in question sat far back in people's mouths. Four of the teeth had decay next to the holes. Scans with high-powered imaging equipment showed ridges within the holes that might have been made by a flint drill. Both observations support that the idea that the people of Mehrgarh were actually practicing dentistry and digging out cavities. To check their conclusions, the scientists made models of prehistoric stone tools and used them to drill human cheek teeth. (The teeth were not attached to people at the time.) Using this method, it only took a minute to make a hole that resembled the ones that Mehrgarh dentists made. Getting cavities drilled and filled is important, but it can be uncomfortable. Next time you're at the dentist, however, just be thankful that there's no sharp blade of flint in your mouth. That could be really unpleasant!—E. Sohn

Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™