Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Firefly Delight
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
The Littlest Lemurs
Behavior
Pipefish power from mom
Taking a Spill for Science
Nice Chimps
Birds
Seagulls
Pheasants
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
A Big, Weird Dino
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Deep History
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
Acid Snails
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Settling the Americas
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Mako Sharks
Lampreys
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Chew for Health
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math is a real brain bender
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Running with Sneaker Science
Invertebrates
Lice
Camel Spiders
Snails
Mammals
Pekingese
Lion
Poodles
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Einstein's Skateboard
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Tortoises
Turtles
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Unveiling Titan
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Pluto's New Moons

The first time that you learn about the planets, it all seems so simple. There are nine of them, including Earth. All orbit the sun. Then, you learn about moons, and things get a little more complicated. Moons orbit planets. We have one. Saturn has more than 45. As soon as you've memorized the planet lessons in your textbook, however, you've got more work to do. The Hubble Space Telescope has just spotted two more moons around Pluto, adding to the one we already knew about. If the finding is true, astronomers will have to rethink what they know about the planet and about the Kuiper belt—a collection of small, icy objects that lingers way out on the edge of our solar system. Until now, scientists had supposed that Pluto had just one moon, called Charon. This object follows an orbit 19,600 kilometers (12,200 miles) from the planet and measures 1,270 kilometers (790 miles) across. Charon is about half as wide as Pluto. The new moons have been named S/2005 P1 and S/2005 P2. The first one lies about 48,000 kilometers (30,000 miles) from Pluto and has an estimated diameter of 56 kilometers (35 miles). The second lies about 64,000 kilometers (39,800 miles) from Pluto and has a diameter of about 48 kilometers (30 miles). For every 12 times that Charon goes around Pluto, it looks like S/2005 P1 goes around 3 times, while S/2005 P2 goes around twice. Based on this information, scientists suspect that the moons formed at the same time that Charon formed, when some massive object smashed into Pluto soon after the planet's birth 4.5 billion years ago. Chunks that flew off in the collision then became moons when they were trapped by the planet's gravity. More observations are needed to confirm that the two objects actually orbit Pluto, but astronomers have reason to believe that they do. The same two objects also appear in pictures taken by Hubble 3 years ago. After finishing with your textbook, keep watching the news. It's the only way to keep up with our constantly changing map of outer space.—E. Sohn

Pluto's New Moons
Pluto's New Moons








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™