Agriculture
Springing forward
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Return of the Lost Limbs
Poor Devils
Behavior
Math Naturals
Double take
The (kids') eyes have it
Birds
Flightless Birds
Storks
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Supersonic Splash
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
Computers with Attitude
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
A Big, Weird Dino
Have shell, will travel
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Weird, new ant
Shrinking Glaciers
Quick Quake Alerts
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Acid Snails
A Change in Climate
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Untangling Human Origins
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Skates
Basking Sharks
Lungfish
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Building a Food Pyramid
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Giant Clam
Cockroaches
Tapeworms
Mammals
Whales
Rodents
Humans
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Underwater Jungles
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Pythons
Garter Snakes
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Chaos Among the Planets
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Supersuits for Superheroes
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
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Pluto's New Moons

The first time that you learn about the planets, it all seems so simple. There are nine of them, including Earth. All orbit the sun. Then, you learn about moons, and things get a little more complicated. Moons orbit planets. We have one. Saturn has more than 45. As soon as you've memorized the planet lessons in your textbook, however, you've got more work to do. The Hubble Space Telescope has just spotted two more moons around Pluto, adding to the one we already knew about. If the finding is true, astronomers will have to rethink what they know about the planet and about the Kuiper belt—a collection of small, icy objects that lingers way out on the edge of our solar system. Until now, scientists had supposed that Pluto had just one moon, called Charon. This object follows an orbit 19,600 kilometers (12,200 miles) from the planet and measures 1,270 kilometers (790 miles) across. Charon is about half as wide as Pluto. The new moons have been named S/2005 P1 and S/2005 P2. The first one lies about 48,000 kilometers (30,000 miles) from Pluto and has an estimated diameter of 56 kilometers (35 miles). The second lies about 64,000 kilometers (39,800 miles) from Pluto and has a diameter of about 48 kilometers (30 miles). For every 12 times that Charon goes around Pluto, it looks like S/2005 P1 goes around 3 times, while S/2005 P2 goes around twice. Based on this information, scientists suspect that the moons formed at the same time that Charon formed, when some massive object smashed into Pluto soon after the planet's birth 4.5 billion years ago. Chunks that flew off in the collision then became moons when they were trapped by the planet's gravity. More observations are needed to confirm that the two objects actually orbit Pluto, but astronomers have reason to believe that they do. The same two objects also appear in pictures taken by Hubble 3 years ago. After finishing with your textbook, keep watching the news. It's the only way to keep up with our constantly changing map of outer space.—E. Sohn

Pluto's New Moons
Pluto's New Moons








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