Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Springing forward
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Firefly Delight
Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs
Behavior
Wired for Math
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The Smell of Trust
Birds
Macaws
Kiwis
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
The science of disappearing
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Computers
Supersonic Splash
The science of disappearing
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fingerprinting Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Island of Hope
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
What is groundwater
Giant snakes invading North America
Saving Wetlands
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Untangling Human Origins
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Salmon
Hammerhead Sharks
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Essence of Celery
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A New Touch
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Cockroaches
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Asian Elephants
Weasels
Grizzly Bear
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Iguanas
Tortoises
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Unveiling Titan
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Reach for the Sky
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Arctic Melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Plants Travel Wind Highways

Gusts of wind can knock you over if they blow hard enough. If you were a plant, though, the wind could carry you or your spores for thousands of kilometers. A NASA satellite called QuikSCAT has revealed highways of wind over Earth's oceans. Now, scientists from Spain say these invisible roads may explain why many nonflowering plants, such as mosses and lichens, grow where they do. The scientists used data from QuikSCAT for a group of islands in the Southern Hemisphere, near Antarctica. The satellite carries a piece of equipment that sends microwaves from space to the surface of the ocean. The pattern that bounces back reveals which way the winds are blowing. Winds tend to blow counterclockwise around Antarctica, but there are lots of shifts and spirals thrown in. When the researchers compared these wind patterns to botanical data, they found that the wind had an important effect on where species of mosses, lichens, and other nonflowering plant species grow. For example, Bouvet Island and Heard Island share 30 percent of their moss species, 29 percent of liverworts, and 32 percent of lichens—even though the islands are 4,430 kilometers apart. In contrast, Gough Island and Bouvet Island, which are just 1,860 kilometers apart, share only 16 percent of mosses and 17 percent of liverworts, and they have no lichens in common. Ferns and flowering plants don't travel as well in the wind, so they don't show the same kinds of distribution patterns. Where do you think you would end up if you could ride the wind?—E. Sohn

Plants Travel Wind Highways
Plants Travel Wind Highways








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™