Agriculture
Springing forward
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Monkey Math
Odor-Chasing Penguins
Cool Penguins
Behavior
From dipping to fishing
Swine flu goes global
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Flightless Birds
Nightingales
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
The newest superheavy in town
Music of the Future
Atom Hauler
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Dino Babies
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Plastic-munching microbes
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
Pollution Detective
To Catch a Dragonfly
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
A Plankhouse Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Fish
Bass
Skates
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Yummy bugs
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Nature's Medicines
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Oysters
Termites
Mammals
Gazelle
African Wild Dog
Platypus
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
One ring around them all
Road Bumps
Invisibility Ring
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Sweet, Sticky Science
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Gila Monsters
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Slip-sliding away
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
A Change in Climate
Watering the Air
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Planning for Mars

Forget the moon: We’re headed to Mars. That’s one message President Obama delivered on April 15, during a speech about the future of the U.S. space program. The president’s plans do not involve a return trip to the moon, which humans have not visited since 1972. But they do include a trip to an asteroid and, eventually, to Mars. Obama spoke at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center near Orlando, Fla., which is where space shuttles blast off (on the back of powerful rockets) and often land. Space shuttles carry astronauts and scientists into space, but the space shuttles will no longer be used after this year. Obama’s speech was important because he talked about what will happen after the shuttles are retired. “No one is more committed to human exploration of space, to manned space flight, than I am,” Obama said to the crowd, “but we've got to do it in a smart way.” The new plan for space exploration includes many changes. It cancels a program called Constellation, which was introduced by President George W. Bush. Under the Constellation program, scientists would have built powerful new rockets to take humans to the moon. Under to the new plan, the next generation of rockets will launch to carry humans far beyond the moon. Obama spoke of getting human beings to an asteroid in the year 2025, and to Mars about 10 years after that. By the mid-2030s, he said, spacecraft carrying crew would be landing on Mars. The Constellation program also included plans for a ship called Orion, which can carry people. Orion was not canceled in the new plan. One of the most important changes to the space program involves money. In President Obama’s plan, NASA will get $6 billion over the next five years. That money, however, will be spent on new technologies, not on the development of the powerful rockets that we’ll need to get to Mars. Instead, the new plan calls for private companies to create and build the rockets and spacecraft that can carry people and supplies into space. Obama hopes that companies who compete for the business of flying people into space will find a cheaper way to do it. “The real key in all of this is the ability of the private sector to do what NASA has been unable to do for about the last 30 years, and that is cut the cost to low Earth orbit. As long as NASA was spending $4 billion to $5 billion a year flying the space shuttle, [the agency] was going nowhere,” Howard McCurdy told Science News. McCurdy studies government policies related to space at the American University in Washington, D.C. Some critics say Obama’s plan is too risky and not specific enough — after all, companies may not find a way to get people into space. Other scientists applaud the pfresident’s effort to energize the space program. “I am very happy about the introduction of new innovative commercial approaches in human space flight,” Alan Stern told Science News. Stern is a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., and used to work for NASA.

Planning for Mars
Planning for Mars








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™