Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Who's Knocking?
A Meal Plan for Birds
Cannibal Crickets
Behavior
Internet Generation
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Birds
Birds We Eat
Cranes
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Fog Buster
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Computers
The science of disappearing
The Book of Life
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Petrified Lightning
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
A Change in Time
Blooming Jellies
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Codfish
Lungfish
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Setting a Prime Number Record
Math of the World
Human Body
Foul Play?
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Ticks
Jellyfish
Millipedes
Mammals
Dachshunds
Numbats
Marsupials
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Project Music
The Particle Zoo
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Fungus Hunt
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Tortoises
Caimans
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Toy Challenge
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Planning for Mars

Forget the moon: We’re headed to Mars. That’s one message President Obama delivered on April 15, during a speech about the future of the U.S. space program. The president’s plans do not involve a return trip to the moon, which humans have not visited since 1972. But they do include a trip to an asteroid and, eventually, to Mars. Obama spoke at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center near Orlando, Fla., which is where space shuttles blast off (on the back of powerful rockets) and often land. Space shuttles carry astronauts and scientists into space, but the space shuttles will no longer be used after this year. Obama’s speech was important because he talked about what will happen after the shuttles are retired. “No one is more committed to human exploration of space, to manned space flight, than I am,” Obama said to the crowd, “but we've got to do it in a smart way.” The new plan for space exploration includes many changes. It cancels a program called Constellation, which was introduced by President George W. Bush. Under the Constellation program, scientists would have built powerful new rockets to take humans to the moon. Under to the new plan, the next generation of rockets will launch to carry humans far beyond the moon. Obama spoke of getting human beings to an asteroid in the year 2025, and to Mars about 10 years after that. By the mid-2030s, he said, spacecraft carrying crew would be landing on Mars. The Constellation program also included plans for a ship called Orion, which can carry people. Orion was not canceled in the new plan. One of the most important changes to the space program involves money. In President Obama’s plan, NASA will get $6 billion over the next five years. That money, however, will be spent on new technologies, not on the development of the powerful rockets that we’ll need to get to Mars. Instead, the new plan calls for private companies to create and build the rockets and spacecraft that can carry people and supplies into space. Obama hopes that companies who compete for the business of flying people into space will find a cheaper way to do it. “The real key in all of this is the ability of the private sector to do what NASA has been unable to do for about the last 30 years, and that is cut the cost to low Earth orbit. As long as NASA was spending $4 billion to $5 billion a year flying the space shuttle, [the agency] was going nowhere,” Howard McCurdy told Science News. McCurdy studies government policies related to space at the American University in Washington, D.C. Some critics say Obama’s plan is too risky and not specific enough — after all, companies may not find a way to get people into space. Other scientists applaud the pfresident’s effort to energize the space program. “I am very happy about the introduction of new innovative commercial approaches in human space flight,” Alan Stern told Science News. Stern is a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., and used to work for NASA.

Planning for Mars
Planning for Mars








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™