Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Making the most of a meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Behavior
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
A Recipe for Happiness
Contemplating thought
Birds
Hawks
Flamingos
Swans
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
The newest superheavy in town
Supersonic Splash
Computers
A Light Delay
A Classroom of the Mind
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Bugs with Gas
Environment
Snow Traps
Fungus Hunt
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Watching deep-space fireworks
Settling the Americas
Fish
Codfish
Bass
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Sponges' secret weapon
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Setting a Prime Number Record
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Running with Sneaker Science
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Mollusks
Shrimps
Mammals
Dachshunds
Bumblebee Bats
Numbats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
IceCube Science
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Fungus Hunt
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Pythons
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Baby Star
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on a Rocky Road
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Arctic Melt
Catching Some Rays
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Planet Hunters Nab Three More

There are other planets around other stars in other solar systems. That's the old news. Now, new observations have turned up the three smallest, most Earthlike planets ever found outside our solar system. Each one weighs between 14 and 25 times the mass of Earth. That makes them about the size of Neptune. Until now, none of the extrasolar planets discovered so far has looked anything like Earth. Out of about 135 such planets, nearly all are roughly 300 times Earth's mass. That's the same size as Jupiter, the biggest planet in the solar system. And like Jupiter, they're all big balls of gas around a solid core of rock and ice. Smaller, rocky planets like Earth are much harder to detect. With advances in technology, however, the view is getting better. The new planets are so small and far away that astronomers still can't see them directly. Instead, they look for tiny wobbles in the motion of a planet's star, caused by the planet's gravity. Using this technique, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, found one of the planets around a star called Gliese 436. The planet appears to be between 21 and 25 times the size of Earth. It speeds around its planet once every 2.64 days. The second planet orbits a star called 55 Cancri, which is similar to the sun. It's probably 18 times the mass of Earth, and its "year" is just 2.81 days long, say researchers from the University of Texas in Austin. Their discovery adds to three Jupiter-size planets already known to orbit the same star. The third planet, detected by astronomers in Portugal, is at least 14 times as massive as Earth. It orbits a star called mu Arae. Because the new planets are so small and close to their stars, astronomers suspect that the planets are rocky. The discoveries may help astronomers figure out how planets form. And with Earthlike planets within our reach, the chances of finding life outside our solar system have improved a bit. Someone might be out there, after all.E. Sohn

Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Planet Hunters Nab Three More








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™