Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Awake at Night
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
Between a rock and a wet place
Longer lives for wild elephants
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Birds
Parrots
Birds We Eat
Vultures
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Getting the dirt on carbon
Lighting goes digital
Computers
Play for Science
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
Digging Dinos
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Shrinking Glaciers
Springing forward
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Bald Eagles Forever
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Tuna
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
How Super Are Superfruits?
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Running with Sneaker Science
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Dust Mites
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Mule
Capybaras
Beavers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Project Music
Dreams of Floating in Space
Road Bumps
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Garter Snakes
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
A Planet from the Early Universe
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Planet Hunters Nab Three More

There are other planets around other stars in other solar systems. That's the old news. Now, new observations have turned up the three smallest, most Earthlike planets ever found outside our solar system. Each one weighs between 14 and 25 times the mass of Earth. That makes them about the size of Neptune. Until now, none of the extrasolar planets discovered so far has looked anything like Earth. Out of about 135 such planets, nearly all are roughly 300 times Earth's mass. That's the same size as Jupiter, the biggest planet in the solar system. And like Jupiter, they're all big balls of gas around a solid core of rock and ice. Smaller, rocky planets like Earth are much harder to detect. With advances in technology, however, the view is getting better. The new planets are so small and far away that astronomers still can't see them directly. Instead, they look for tiny wobbles in the motion of a planet's star, caused by the planet's gravity. Using this technique, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, found one of the planets around a star called Gliese 436. The planet appears to be between 21 and 25 times the size of Earth. It speeds around its planet once every 2.64 days. The second planet orbits a star called 55 Cancri, which is similar to the sun. It's probably 18 times the mass of Earth, and its "year" is just 2.81 days long, say researchers from the University of Texas in Austin. Their discovery adds to three Jupiter-size planets already known to orbit the same star. The third planet, detected by astronomers in Portugal, is at least 14 times as massive as Earth. It orbits a star called mu Arae. Because the new planets are so small and close to their stars, astronomers suspect that the planets are rocky. The discoveries may help astronomers figure out how planets form. And with Earthlike planets within our reach, the chances of finding life outside our solar system have improved a bit. Someone might be out there, after all.E. Sohn

Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Planet Hunters Nab Three More








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™