Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Animals
Not Slippery When Wet
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Odor-Chasing Penguins
Behavior
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
From dipping to fishing
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Birds
Pheasants
Flamingos
Dodos
Chemistry and Materials
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Small but WISE
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
South America's sticky tar pits
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
A Plankhouse Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Salmon
Catfish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
How Super Are Superfruits?
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Prime Time for Cicadas
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Hear, Hear
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Flies
Octopuses
Invertebrates
Mammals
Siamese Cats
African Hippopotamus
Chimpanzees
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
One ring around them all
IceCube Science
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Turtles
Chameleons
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Bionic Bacteria
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Reach for the Sky
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Catching Some Rays
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Piranha

The piranhas or pirañas are a group of carnivorous freshwater fish living in South American rivers. They belong to five genera of the subfamily of Serrasalminae (which also includes closely related herbivorous fish including pacus and silver dollars). They are normally about 15 to 25 cm long (6 to 10 inches), although reportedly individuals have been found up to 40 cm in length. They are known for their sharp teeth (able to bite through a steel fishing hook) and an aggressive appetite for meat and flesh. They are normally only found in the Amazonian, Guianas and Paraguayan river systems. However, piranha (most likely former aquarium-dwellers) are also occasionally found in the Potomac River, but they typically do not survive the cold winters of that region Recent research on Serrasalmus aff. brandtii and Pygocentrus nattereri in Viana Lake, which is formed during the wet season when the Rio Pindare (a left bank tributary of the Rio Mearim) floods, has shown that these species eat vegetable matter at some stages in their life history. They are not strictly carnivorous fishes. Piranhas generally pose little threat to humans, and attacks on humans are extremely rare. Natives frequently swim in piranha infested water without attacks or scratches. However, it is not recommended to swim where piranha live in drought season because of increased aggressiveness caused by food scarcity and increased tendency to form large schools. Piranha fish also have the same sensory system that enables sharks to detect blood in minuscule amounts, so it is believed that swimming with an open cut may enhance the chance of an attack.

Piranha
Piranha








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™