Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Odor-Chasing Penguins
Armadillo
Behavior
A brain-boosting video game
Reading Body Language
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Robins
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
The science of disappearing
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
Dino Babies
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Springing forward
Riding to Earth's Core
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Catfish
Salmon
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
The Essence of Celery
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Sun Screen
Remembering Facts and Feelings
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Sponges
Butterflies
Ticks
Mammals
Labradors
African Warthogs
Grizzly Bear
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
IceCube Science
Road Bumps
Electric Backpack
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Underwater Jungles
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Garter Snakes
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Beyond Bar Codes
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Phantom Energy and the Big Rip

Imagine the universe being torn to shreds: Stars and galaxies tear away from each other. Earth escapes from the sun. Tiny molecules pop apart with explosive force. New analyses show that the world could end in just such a doomsday scenario. Scientists are calling it the Big Rip. The good news: We are safe for another 21 billion years or so. The key culprit is dark energy, also known as phantom energy, a mysterious and invisible substance that supposedly fills the universe. One idea is that dark energy works against the ordinarily inward pull of gravity to push things apart. Dark energy might be the force responsible for recent evidence that the universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate. Now, analyses by Robert Caldwell of Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., and his colleagues, suggest that dark energy will accumulate over time, pushing the universe toward a runaway expansion and ultimate demise at age 35 billion years, 21 billion years from now. The Milky Way would be destroyed about 60 million years before the end of time. A few months before the Big Rip, Earth would float away from the sun's pull. With 30 minutes to go, Earth itself would fall apart. And at the very end, atoms would break up. Talk about going out with a bang!E. Sohn

Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™