Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Watching out for vultures
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Animals
Copybees
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Hearing Whales
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
The case of the headless ant
Swine flu goes global
Birds
Tropical Birds
Cardinals
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Sugary Survival Skill
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
Digging for Ancient DNA
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Life under Ice
Island of Hope
Environment
A Stormy History
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Little People Cause Big Surprise
A Long Haul
Fish
Eels
Dogfish
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Gut Microbes and Weight
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Scallops
Sea Anemones
Bees
Mammals
African Wild Dog
Cats
Pekingese
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
How children learn
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Gaining a Swift Lift
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Iguanas
Snapping Turtles
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Phantom Energy and the Big Rip

Imagine the universe being torn to shreds: Stars and galaxies tear away from each other. Earth escapes from the sun. Tiny molecules pop apart with explosive force. New analyses show that the world could end in just such a doomsday scenario. Scientists are calling it the Big Rip. The good news: We are safe for another 21 billion years or so. The key culprit is dark energy, also known as phantom energy, a mysterious and invisible substance that supposedly fills the universe. One idea is that dark energy works against the ordinarily inward pull of gravity to push things apart. Dark energy might be the force responsible for recent evidence that the universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate. Now, analyses by Robert Caldwell of Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., and his colleagues, suggest that dark energy will accumulate over time, pushing the universe toward a runaway expansion and ultimate demise at age 35 billion years, 21 billion years from now. The Milky Way would be destroyed about 60 million years before the end of time. A few months before the Big Rip, Earth would float away from the sun's pull. With 30 minutes to go, Earth itself would fall apart. And at the very end, atoms would break up. Talk about going out with a bang!E. Sohn

Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™