Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Springing forward
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Thieves of a Feather
From Chimps to People
Cannibal Crickets
Behavior
Puberty gone wild
Monkeys in the Mirror
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Birds
Kiwis
Pelicans
Albatrosses
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Earth from the inside out
When frog gender flips
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
A Classroom of the Mind
Music of the Future
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Living Fossil
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
A Change in Time
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Saltwater Fish
Freshwater Fish
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Spit Power
A Long Trek to Asia
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Corals
Ticks
Mammals
Lhasa Apsos
Bison
Woolly Mammoths
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
The Particle Zoo
Invisibility Ring
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Flower family knows its roots
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Cobras
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Smart Windows
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Troubles with Hubble
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Ospreys

The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a medium to large raptor, which is a specialist fish-eater with a worldwide distribution. It is often known by other colloquial names such as fishhawk, seahawk or Fish Eagle. Weights and Measures: The Osprey is 52-60cm (20.5-23.6 inches) long with a 152-167cm (5-5.5 feet) wingspan. It has white underparts and long, narrow wings with four "finger" feathers at the end of each, which give it a very distinctive appearance. You are What you Eat: The Osprey is particularly well adapted to its diet, with reversible outer toes, closable nostrils to keep out water during dives, and backwards facing scales on the talons which act as barbs to help catch fish. Call of the Osprey: The call of the Osprey is a series of sharp whistles, cheep, cheep, or yewk, yewk. Near the nest, a frenzied cheereek! Hunting: The Osprey locates its prey from the air, often hovering prior to plunging feet-first into the water to seize a fish. As it rises back into flight the fish is turned head forward to reduce drag. The 'barbed' talons are such effective tools for grasping fish that, on occasion, an Osprey may be unable to release a fish that is heavier than expected. This can cause the Osprey to be pulled into the water, where it may either swim to safety or succumb to hypothermia and drown. Ospreys in Danger: Twenty to thirty years ago, Ospreys in some regions faced possible extinction, because the species could not produce enough young to maintain the population. Since the ban of DDT in many countries in the early 1970s, together with reduced persecution, the Ospreys, as well as other affected bird of prey species are making significant recoveries. A Place to Call Home: It breeds by freshwater lakes, and sometimes on coastal brackish waters. The nest is a large heap of sticks built in trees, rocky outcrops, telephone poles or artificial platforms. In some regions with high Osprey densities, such as Chesapeake Bay, USA, most Ospreys do not start breeding until they are five to seven years old. Many of the structures they need to build nests on are already taken. If there are no nesting sites available, young Ospreys may be forced to delay breeding. To ease this problem, posts may erected to provide more sites. Life-long Lovers: Ospreys usually mate for life. In March or earlier depending on region, they begin a five-month period of partnership to raise their young. Females lay 3–4 eggs by late April, and rely on the size of their nest to help conserve heat. The eggs are approximately the size of chicken eggs, and cinnamon colored. The eggs generally incubate for 5 weeks. After hatching, 2-ounce chicks become fliers within eight weeks. When food is scarce, the first chicks to hatch are most likely to survive. The typical lifespan is 20-25 years. The One and Only... The Osprey differs in several respects from the other diurnal birds of prey, and has always presented something of a riddle to the taxonomist. Here it is treated as the sole member of the family Pandionidae, and the family listed in its traditional place as part of the order Falconiformes. Other schemes place it alongside the hawks and eagles in the family Accipitridae—which itself can be regarded as making up the bulk of the order Accipitriformes or else be lumped with the Falconidae into Falconiformes— and others again group it alongside the other raptors in a greatly enlarged Ciconiiformes. On Osprey! The Osprey is the official bird of Nova Scotia in Canada and Sudermannia in Sweden. It is the official mascot and team name for the University of North Florida and the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. The bird was depicted on the 1986 series Canadian $10 note.

Ospreys
Ospreys








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™