Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Making the most of a meal
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Toads
Animals
Clone Wars
Ants on Stilts
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Swine flu goes global
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Dino-bite!
Birds
Dodos
Ibises
Flightless Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Revving Up Green Machines
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
South America's sticky tar pits
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Riding to Earth's Core
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Untangling Human Origins
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Fish
Mako Sharks
Sturgeons
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Starfish
Butterflies
Mammals
Opposum
Squirrels
Giant Panda
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Flower family knows its roots
Springing forward
Reptiles
Lizards
Asp
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Black Holes That Burp
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt

It can be hard to resist a bag of salty popcorn at the movies. Scientists may now be one step closer to explaining why. They have discovered several genes in fruit flies that help the insects detect salt. All cells depend on salt to survive, and animals need to make sure they get enough of the nutrient. Previous research revealed tiny pores, known as epithelial sodium channels, on the taste buds of rodents and other mammals that respond to salty foods. These particular sodium channels seem to be so important to mice that the animals die when scientists inactivate the system. Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Iowa wanted to find out if other animals have similar salt-sensing systems. So, they identified genes in fruit flies that they suspected might control sodium channel production. Then, they turned those genes off in a group of the insects. The mutant flies survived. Unlike regular flies, however, they were equally attracted to water with and without salt, and they couldn’t tell the difference between different kinds of salt. If people end up having the same kind of salt-detection system as mice and flies, researchers might be able to figure out why we like salty foods so much. Too much salty food can be bad for your health, so the work could also lead to salt substitutes that taste good but are okay for people with high blood pressure. Even if scientists don't yet know exactly how people detect salt, it's pretty clear that french fries, potato chips, popcorn, and other salty snacks have a natural appeal.—E. Sohn

Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™