Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Elephant Mimics
Cacophony Acoustics
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
Talking with Hands
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Quails
Swans
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Popping to Perfection
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Galaxies on the go
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Fingerprinting Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Watering the Air
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
The Birds are Falling
Out in the Cold
Flu river
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Swordfish
Saltwater Fish
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Yummy bugs
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Play for Science
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Worms
Octopuses
Mammals
Canines
Little Brown Bats
Dingoes
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
IceCube Science
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Farms sprout in cities
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Asp
Reptiles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Catching a Comet's Tail
Sounds of Titan
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Supersuits for Superheroes
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Troubles with Hubble
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe

The universe has been around for an extra long time. Astronomers used to estimate that the oldest stars were about 13 billion years old. New data suggest that these stars are nearly a billion years older than that. For most of its life, a star produces energy and heat by fusing hydrogen to make helium inside its core. Near the end of its life, when its hydrogen supply is running low, the star continues to convert hydrogen into helium but requires the presence of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to do so. Two teams of scientists have now used particle accelerators—atom smashers—to mimic the conditions inside stars. By studying high-energy collisions between hydrogen nuclei (protons) and nitrogen nuclei, the researchers could check how quickly nuclear reactions inside a star proceed. Both groups, one at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the other at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics in Italy, found that the reactions occur only half as fast as had been estimated. Such a slow reaction time allows gravity to shrink a star more than it would if the reaction were faster. As a result, an elderly star looks brighter than it otherwise would. Brightness is supposed to indicate how old a star is. Now that they know how deceptive brightness can be, astronomers have had to revise their estimates of star age. In line with observations from a satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, the universe now appears to be about 13.7 billion years old, astronomers say. That's quite a lot of time to ponder.—E. Sohn

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™