Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
New Elephant-Shrew
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Sleepless at Sea
Behavior
Pain Expectations
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Nice Chimps
Birds
Rheas
Birds We Eat
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
The memory of a material
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Computers
The science of disappearing
A Classroom of the Mind
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Middle school science adventures
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Ancient Heights
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
Lampreys
Carp
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
It's a Math World for Animals
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Heart Revival
Gut Microbes and Weight
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Clams
Termites
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Sperm Whale
Chinchillas
Sun Bear
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Einstein's Skateboard
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Seeds of the Future
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Caimans
Iguanas
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Supersuits for Superheroes
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe

The universe has been around for an extra long time. Astronomers used to estimate that the oldest stars were about 13 billion years old. New data suggest that these stars are nearly a billion years older than that. For most of its life, a star produces energy and heat by fusing hydrogen to make helium inside its core. Near the end of its life, when its hydrogen supply is running low, the star continues to convert hydrogen into helium but requires the presence of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to do so. Two teams of scientists have now used particle accelerators—atom smashers—to mimic the conditions inside stars. By studying high-energy collisions between hydrogen nuclei (protons) and nitrogen nuclei, the researchers could check how quickly nuclear reactions inside a star proceed. Both groups, one at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the other at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics in Italy, found that the reactions occur only half as fast as had been estimated. Such a slow reaction time allows gravity to shrink a star more than it would if the reaction were faster. As a result, an elderly star looks brighter than it otherwise would. Brightness is supposed to indicate how old a star is. Now that they know how deceptive brightness can be, astronomers have had to revise their estimates of star age. In line with observations from a satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, the universe now appears to be about 13.7 billion years old, astronomers say. That's quite a lot of time to ponder.—E. Sohn

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™