Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Bee Disease
Walks on the Wild Side
Behavior
Pain Expectations
Flower family knows its roots
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Birds
Turkeys
Kiwis
Hummingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
The memory of a material
Silk’s superpowers
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
The science of disappearing
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Alien Invasions
The Wolf and the Cow
Shrimpy Invaders
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
If Only Bones Could Speak
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Tiger Sharks
Skates
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
The mercury in that tuna
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Spit Power
A Better Flu Shot
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Scallops
Fleas
Cockroaches
Mammals
African Elephants
Elk
Blue Whales
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Black Hole Journey
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Sweet, Sticky Science
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Asp
Box Turtles
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Moons
Return to Space
A Planet from the Early Universe
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Young Scientists Take Flight
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe

The universe has been around for an extra long time. Astronomers used to estimate that the oldest stars were about 13 billion years old. New data suggest that these stars are nearly a billion years older than that. For most of its life, a star produces energy and heat by fusing hydrogen to make helium inside its core. Near the end of its life, when its hydrogen supply is running low, the star continues to convert hydrogen into helium but requires the presence of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to do so. Two teams of scientists have now used particle accelerators—atom smashers—to mimic the conditions inside stars. By studying high-energy collisions between hydrogen nuclei (protons) and nitrogen nuclei, the researchers could check how quickly nuclear reactions inside a star proceed. Both groups, one at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the other at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics in Italy, found that the reactions occur only half as fast as had been estimated. Such a slow reaction time allows gravity to shrink a star more than it would if the reaction were faster. As a result, an elderly star looks brighter than it otherwise would. Brightness is supposed to indicate how old a star is. Now that they know how deceptive brightness can be, astronomers have had to revise their estimates of star age. In line with observations from a satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, the universe now appears to be about 13.7 billion years old, astronomers say. That's quite a lot of time to ponder.—E. Sohn

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™