Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
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Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Bee Disease
Monkeys Count
Behavior
A Light Delay
Primate Memory Showdown
Talking with Hands
Birds
Ducks
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Chemistry and Materials
The Buzz about Caffeine
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Supersonic Splash
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fingerprinting Fossils
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Quick Quake Alerts
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Power of the Wind
A Change in Climate
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Childhood's Long History
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Tiger Sharks
Hammerhead Sharks
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
The Color of Health
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Dreaming makes perfect
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Octopuses
Crabs
Giant Squid
Mammals
Dingoes
Miniature Schnauzers
Foxes
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Speedy stars
Invisibility Ring
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Stalking Plants by Scent
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Reptiles
Caimans
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
A Dusty Birthplace
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Warmest Year on Record
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Older Stars, New Age for the Universe

The universe has been around for an extra long time. Astronomers used to estimate that the oldest stars were about 13 billion years old. New data suggest that these stars are nearly a billion years older than that. For most of its life, a star produces energy and heat by fusing hydrogen to make helium inside its core. Near the end of its life, when its hydrogen supply is running low, the star continues to convert hydrogen into helium but requires the presence of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to do so. Two teams of scientists have now used particle accelerators—atom smashers—to mimic the conditions inside stars. By studying high-energy collisions between hydrogen nuclei (protons) and nitrogen nuclei, the researchers could check how quickly nuclear reactions inside a star proceed. Both groups, one at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the other at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics in Italy, found that the reactions occur only half as fast as had been estimated. Such a slow reaction time allows gravity to shrink a star more than it would if the reaction were faster. As a result, an elderly star looks brighter than it otherwise would. Brightness is supposed to indicate how old a star is. Now that they know how deceptive brightness can be, astronomers have had to revise their estimates of star age. In line with observations from a satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, the universe now appears to be about 13.7 billion years old, astronomers say. That's quite a lot of time to ponder.—E. Sohn

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe








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