Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Hearing Whales
Behavior
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Calculating crime
The Electric Brain
Birds
Crows
Roadrunners
Finches
Chemistry and Materials
Getting the dirt on carbon
Graphene's superstrength
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Hubble trouble doubled
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
The Rise of Yellowstone
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Improving the Camel
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Settling the Americas
A Long Haul
Fish
Skates
Whale Sharks
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Detecting True Art
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Prime Time for Broken Bones
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Scallops
Mammals
Badgers
Giant Panda
Wombats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Powering Ball Lightning
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Nature's Alphabet
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Cobras
Alligators
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
Planning for Mars
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Arctic Melt
Warmest Year on Record
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Odor-Chasing Penguins

The smell of rotten eggs probably makes you cringe. But, for penguins, this smell might mean there's a meal nearby. New research shows that penguins are attracted to this rotten-egg smell and probably use it when foraging for food in the ocean. The study is one of the first to show that penguins have a functioning sense of smell. The rotten-egg smell is caused by a gas known as dimethyl sulfide. Scientists already knew that some seabirds, such as albatrosses and petrels, use this smell to locate areas where tiny sea creatures called phytoplankton live. Phytoplankton produce the chemical, fish eat the phytoplankton, and the birds, in turn, swoop down to eat the fish. Even though penguins don't fly, they do swim along the surface of the water and dive to catch fish. So biologist Gregory Cunningham of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania wondered if penguins might use the same trick. "Seabirds like petrels and penguins have to solve the same problems, so it seemed likely that they would utilize the same techniques for solving those problems," Cunningham says. To test this, Cunningham built a Y-shaped structure. One branch contained the smell, while the other branch was odorless. A penguin sanctuary in Cape Town, South Africa provided the participants: African penguins recovering from being caught in oil spills. Cunningham plopped the penguins down in front of the structure one by one and watched in which direction they went. The penguins made a beeline for the smell. Next, Cunningham visited a colony of wild African penguins living on Robben Island, located off the coast of Cape Town. "Penguins have this really cool system where they build nests anywhere they can," Cunningham says. "All the nests have walkways down to the beach that form penguin highways." Cunningham doused various places along these penguin highways with the rotten-egg smell and observed the birds' behavior as they passed by. He predicted that the penguins would be attracted to these spots in the morning when they were hungry. Actually, the opposite happened. The penguins ignored the smell in the morning, but stopped to check it out on their way back to their nests in the evening. Cunningham says he doesn't know why the birds disregarded the smell at sunrise. But, he hopes that future research will uncover the answer, as well as shed more light on how penguins use smell in other aspects of their lives.óM. Price

Odor-Chasing Penguins
Odor-Chasing Penguins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™