Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Red Apes in Danger
Thieves of a Feather
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Behavior
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Reading Body Language
Island of Hope
Birds
Condors
Songbirds
Geese
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
When frog gender flips
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
South America's sticky tar pits
Supersight for a Dino King
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Rocking the House
Environment
Alien Invasions
Little Bits of Trouble
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Saltwater Fish
White Tip Sharks
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Eat Out, Eat Smart
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Detecting True Art
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Heavy Sleep
Disease Detectives
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Crawfish
Fleas
Mammals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Raccoons
African Hippopotamus
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Springing forward
Getting the dirt on carbon
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Rattlesnakes
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
Slip-sliding away
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Bionic Bacteria
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Odor-Chasing Penguins

The smell of rotten eggs probably makes you cringe. But, for penguins, this smell might mean there's a meal nearby. New research shows that penguins are attracted to this rotten-egg smell and probably use it when foraging for food in the ocean. The study is one of the first to show that penguins have a functioning sense of smell. The rotten-egg smell is caused by a gas known as dimethyl sulfide. Scientists already knew that some seabirds, such as albatrosses and petrels, use this smell to locate areas where tiny sea creatures called phytoplankton live. Phytoplankton produce the chemical, fish eat the phytoplankton, and the birds, in turn, swoop down to eat the fish. Even though penguins don't fly, they do swim along the surface of the water and dive to catch fish. So biologist Gregory Cunningham of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania wondered if penguins might use the same trick. "Seabirds like petrels and penguins have to solve the same problems, so it seemed likely that they would utilize the same techniques for solving those problems," Cunningham says. To test this, Cunningham built a Y-shaped structure. One branch contained the smell, while the other branch was odorless. A penguin sanctuary in Cape Town, South Africa provided the participants: African penguins recovering from being caught in oil spills. Cunningham plopped the penguins down in front of the structure one by one and watched in which direction they went. The penguins made a beeline for the smell. Next, Cunningham visited a colony of wild African penguins living on Robben Island, located off the coast of Cape Town. "Penguins have this really cool system where they build nests anywhere they can," Cunningham says. "All the nests have walkways down to the beach that form penguin highways." Cunningham doused various places along these penguin highways with the rotten-egg smell and observed the birds' behavior as they passed by. He predicted that the penguins would be attracted to these spots in the morning when they were hungry. Actually, the opposite happened. The penguins ignored the smell in the morning, but stopped to check it out on their way back to their nests in the evening. Cunningham says he doesn't know why the birds disregarded the smell at sunrise. But, he hopes that future research will uncover the answer, as well as shed more light on how penguins use smell in other aspects of their lives.—M. Price

Odor-Chasing Penguins
Odor-Chasing Penguins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™