Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
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Toads
Animals
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Mouse Songs
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
Memory by Hypnosis
Listening to Birdsong
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
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Doves
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Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Sticky Silky Feet
Diamond Glow
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Computers with Attitude
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Weird, new ant
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The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Childhood's Long History
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Saltwater Fish
Skates
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The mercury in that tuna
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
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Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
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Prime Time for Cicadas
Math of the World
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Music in the Brain
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Mammals
Rottweilers
Bison
Whales
Parents
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
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Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Project Music
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Surprise Visitor
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
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Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Melting Snow on Mars
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
A Change in Climate
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Nonstop Robot

In some of the scariest science fiction scenarios, evil robots refuse to die, no matter how fiercely people fight back. Now, science fiction has edged into science fact. For the first time, researchers have created a robotic machine that can take a beating and keep on trucking. Developed by scientists from Cornell University and the University of Vermont, the new robot looks like a spider with four legs. Until now, even the most advanced robot was almost certain to break down when damaged. That's because its internal computer simply doesn't know how to operate the machine after its shape has changed. To get around this problem, the spidery robot's developers equipped their invention with eight motors and two sensors that read how the machine is tilting. The motors and sensors all provide electrical signals to the machine's software. Using this information, the system follows a new procedure to figure out the machine's shape at any given moment. The program chooses from among 100,000 possible arrangements of parts. From there, the computer considers a wide variety of possible next steps, and it calculates how best to move the robot forward the longest possible distance, before trying to move again. The new strategy is a major advance in robotics, scientists say, and it's far from scary. The technology may someday help researchers create better artificial limbs that give new freedom to people who lack arms and legs. The new knowledge might also help scientists understand how people and animals figure out their own sense of place in space. "Designing robots that can adapt to changing environments and can compensate for damage has been a difficult problem," says neuroscientist Olaf Sporns of Indiana University in Bloomington. "This work provides a new way toward solving this important problem."E. Sohn

Nonstop Robot
Nonstop Robot








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