Agriculture
Watering the Air
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Gliders in the Family
Behavior
Taking a Spill for Science
Between a rock and a wet place
Brainy bees know two from three
Birds
Lovebirds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
The memory of a material
Graphene's superstrength
Makeup Science
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
The Book of Life
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
Snow Traps
Giant snakes invading North America
The Birds are Falling
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Tilapia
Codfish
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Strong Bones for Life
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Math Naturals
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Running with Sneaker Science
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Fleas
Centipedes
Butterflies
Mammals
Black Bear
Manatees
Glider
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
Speedy stars
Gaining a Swift Lift
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Assembling the Tree of Life
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Tortoises
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Planet from the Early Universe
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Ready, unplug, drive
Reach for the Sky
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Watering the Air
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

No Fat Stars

There's a limit to how big most things can get. Some people are really tall, but no one is as tall as a house. Cats can get really fat, but there's never been a tabby as heavy as a truck. And so on. Now, astronomer Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore has discovered that the size of a star may have a limit, too. No stars in our galaxy, he estimates, can weigh more than 150 times the mass of our sun. This conclusion comes from observations of an area near the center of the Milky Way called the Arches cluster. The cluster is between 2 million and 2.5 million years old, and stars are still forming there. It contains about 2,000 stars. Figer thought that the Arches cluster would be a good place to search for the galaxy's biggest stars because it's still fairly young. Massive stars have short lives, so it wouldn't make sense to look at a cluster that was much older than Arches. It also wouldn't make sense to look at much younger ones because stars in young clusters are still hideen behind gas and dust. The Arches cluster was also promising because it's big. Its total mass is that of about 10,000 suns. In theory, it could hold at least 18 stars weighing more than 130 times the mass of the sun. Using the Hubble Space Telescope to gauge the weight of hundreds of stars in the Arches cluster, Figer found no stars this big. This means, he concluded, that there must be an upper limit to the size of a star—perhaps about 150 times the sun's mass. Astronomers are just beginning to understand the processes behind star birth. No one yet knows what determines the limits on their growth. Figer plans to study clusters of different ages to find out more.—E. Sohn

No Fat Stars
No Fat Stars








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™