Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
Poor Devils
Color-Changing Bugs
Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs
Behavior
Pipefish power from mom
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Birds
Kookaburras
Rheas
Ibises
Chemistry and Materials
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Batteries built by Viruses
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Computers
Galaxies on the go
The Book of Life
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Island of Hope
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Improving the Camel
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Childhood's Long History
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Perches
Angler Fish
Carp
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math of the World
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Gut Microbes and Weight
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Hermit Crabs
Beetles
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Jaguars
Beavers
African Warthogs
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Boa Constrictors
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Slip Sliming Away
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

No Fat Stars

There's a limit to how big most things can get. Some people are really tall, but no one is as tall as a house. Cats can get really fat, but there's never been a tabby as heavy as a truck. And so on. Now, astronomer Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore has discovered that the size of a star may have a limit, too. No stars in our galaxy, he estimates, can weigh more than 150 times the mass of our sun. This conclusion comes from observations of an area near the center of the Milky Way called the Arches cluster. The cluster is between 2 million and 2.5 million years old, and stars are still forming there. It contains about 2,000 stars. Figer thought that the Arches cluster would be a good place to search for the galaxy's biggest stars because it's still fairly young. Massive stars have short lives, so it wouldn't make sense to look at a cluster that was much older than Arches. It also wouldn't make sense to look at much younger ones because stars in young clusters are still hideen behind gas and dust. The Arches cluster was also promising because it's big. Its total mass is that of about 10,000 suns. In theory, it could hold at least 18 stars weighing more than 130 times the mass of the sun. Using the Hubble Space Telescope to gauge the weight of hundreds of stars in the Arches cluster, Figer found no stars this big. This means, he concluded, that there must be an upper limit to the size of a star—perhaps about 150 times the sun's mass. Astronomers are just beginning to understand the processes behind star birth. No one yet knows what determines the limits on their growth. Figer plans to study clusters of different ages to find out more.—E. Sohn

No Fat Stars
No Fat Stars








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™