Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Watching out for vultures
Salamanders and Newts
Return of the Lost Limbs
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Fishy Sounds
Island of Hope
Math is a real brain bender
Fish needs see-through head
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
Salt secrets
Sticky Silky Feet
Getting in Touch with Touch
Troubles with Hubble
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Shrinking Glaciers
An Ocean View's Downside
Out in the Cold
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Puffer Fish
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Chocolate Rules
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Monkeys Count
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Germ Zapper
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Powering Ball Lightning
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Particle Zoo
A Giant Flower's New Family
Fast-flying fungal spores
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Boa Constrictors
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Holes in Martian moon mystery
World of Three Suns
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
A Light Delay
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on a Rocky Road
Revving Up Green Machines
Where rivers run uphill
Watering the Air
Arctic Melt
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Newts are small, usually bright-coloured semiaquatic salamanders of North America, Europe and North Asia, distinguished from other salamanders by the lack of rib or costal grooves along the sides of the body. Credit: National Park ServiceLose an arm? Grow it back! Newts have the ability to regenerate limbs, eyes and spinal cords. The cells at the site of the injury have the ability to de-differentiate, reproduce rapidly, and differentiate again to create a new limb or organ. One theory is that the de-differentiated cells are related to tumour cells since chemicals which produce tumours in other animals will produce additional limbs in newts. Toxic Skin: Many newts produce toxins in their skin secretions as a defence mechanism against predators. The Taricha newts of western North America are particularly toxic; the Credit: National Park ServiceRough-skinned Newt (Taricha granulosa) of the Pacific Northwest produces more than enough tetrodotoxin to kill an adult human foolish enough to swallow a newt. Note that in order to produce harm, the toxins have to enter the body by being ingested or entering a break in the skin; it is safe to handle newts provided one thoroughly washes ones hands before eating. Toxic - humans! Theoretically it is safe to handle newts provided one thoroughly washes one's hands. However, human skin is toxic to newts. Metamorphosis: Newts can take several years to reach sexual maturity. It is known that their main breeding season is between February and June. They are hatched as tadpoles from eggs laid in ponds or slow-moving streams (see image below) and then undergo metamorphosis, during which time they commonly leave the water, only to return to the water to live out their adult lives. The red phase on land: During the time right after metamorphosis, many North American Newt species go through a phase called the eft phase. Their skin turns a reddish color and the animal lives its life on land, almost never seen in the water. It is not until the eft reaches adulthood will it begin to live its life in a more aquatic fashion, during which time it may rarely venture onto land.


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