Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Insect Stowaways
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Behavior
A Global Warming Flap
Nice Chimps
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Seagulls
Pelicans
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Undercover Detectives
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Programming with Alice
Music of the Future
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Catching Some Rays
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Pygmy Sharks
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Prime Time for Cicadas
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Termites
Sea Urchin
Butterflies
Mammals
Pugs
Sun Bear
Shih Tzus
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Speedy stars
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Plants Travel Wind Highways
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Crocodilians
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Sounds of Titan
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Troubles with Hubble
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Watering the Air
Add your Article

New twists for phantom limbs

Phantom” pain is like a ghost in the body — but it’s anything but imaginary. People who have had an arm or leg amputated can often still feel sensations of the missing limb, even though it’s no longer there. These sensations can be painful, and scientists are always looking for new ways to help relieve this phantom pain for amputees. Treatment often involves using mirrors to visually trick the person’s brain. The thinking is that, if a person can “see” his own body in a new way, his brain may stop sending pain messages. In a new study, a team of neuroscientists have made another surprising discovery about amputees: They can be taught to mentally move their missing limbs in ways that are impossible in the real, physical world. It’s impossible for a person to bend his wrist down and then twist his hand around in a full circle. Seven people who had had their arms amputated above the elbow participated in the experiment. After extensive mental training, four of the seven were able to feel the sensation of this impossible act, and describe it in detail. “It is very surprising that anybody — amputees or not — can learn impossible movements just by thinking about it,” Henrik Ehrsson of the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, told Science News. Ehrsson is a neuroscientist, which is a scientist who studies the brain and nervous system. Although the study itself is interesting, it may be able to help people with other kinds of mental disorders. A person with anorexia nervosa, for example, loses her appetite and/or stops eating, sometimes with fatal results. People with anorexia are usually believed to have a distorted self-image and often see themselves in an extremely negative way. But people suffering from this condition may benefit from this new research, Lorimer Moseley of the Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute in Randwick, Australia, told to Science News. Just as amputees imagined their phantom limbs could move in impossible ways, a person with anorexia may be able to change self-image by concentrating on a change to the body. V.S. Ramachandran is a neuroscientist and the director of the Center for Brain and Cognition at the University of California, San Diego. In his research, Ramachandran has shown that phantom pain can be reduced with the help of a mirror. The mirror is placed so that when the amputee looks in the mirror, it looks like he has both hands. As he looks at the reflection, he clenches and unclenches his one hand while—and it appears as though both hands and are clenching and unclenching. At the same time, he mentally clenches and unclenches his phantom hand. When he sees both hands unclenching, he feels pain lessen. Ramachandran says his mirror therapy, as well as the new research, show that much is left to learn about how the brain perceives the body. “Body image turns out to be extraordinarily plastic,” Ramachandran told Science News. “We think of ourselves as stable people with a stable body image — but we can inhabit a body that cannot exist in the physical world.” POWER WORDS (adapted from the Yahoo! Kids Dictionary) neuroscience Science that deals with the nervous system and brain. amputee A person who has had one or more limbs removed. perceive To become aware of directly through any of the senses, especially sight or hearing. phantom pain Pain or discomfort felt by an amputee in the area of the missing limb. anorexia nervosa A psychophysiological disorder usually occurring in young women that is characterized by an abnormal fear of becoming obese, a distorted self-image, a persistent unwillingness to eat, and severe weight loss. It is often accompanied by self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, malnutrition, amenorrhea and other physiological changes

New twists for phantom limbs
New twists for phantom limbs








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™