Agriculture
Springing forward
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Firefly Delight
Bee Disease
Professor Ant
Behavior
Flower family knows its roots
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Ear pain, weight gain
Birds
Hawks
Cranes
Condors
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Picture the Smell
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Have shell, will travel
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
What is groundwater
Environment
City Trees Beat Country Trees
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Marlin
Perches
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math is a real brain bender
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Sun Screen
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Crabs
Butterflies
Worms
Mammals
Miniature Schnauzers
Whales
Gazelle
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Road Bumps
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Plants Travel Wind Highways
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Tortoises
Snakes
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Return to Space
Slip-sliding away
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

New Monkey Business

A new kind of monkey is giving scientists a lot to think about. Two groups of researchers independently discovered the rare creature in different forests in Tanzania last year (see "New Mammals"). They classified the shy animal as a mangabey, a type of primate, and gave it the species name Lophocebus kipunji. The monkey, however, may not be a mangabey after all. New evidence suggests that it belongs to a brand new genus (a category that's one step broader than species). It may fit in the primate family tree closer to baboons than it does to mangabeys. When the scientists named L. kipunji, they had seen it in the wild and taken pictures of it. But they had never been able to study one up close. Then, last August, a Tanzanian farmer found a dead kipunji in a trap that he had set to catch animals that tried to eat his crops. To better understand its place in the primate family tree, a group of international scientists collected samples of the genetic material DNA from the dead animal. Analyses of the DNA suggested that this new monkey is more closely related to baboons than it is to mangabeys. Comparisons of the young male monkey's body to those in the baboon collection at Chicago's Field Museum, however, told a different story. L. kipunji just didn't fit in. It didn't look like a baboon. If it's not a mangabey, and it's not a baboon, then what is it? The researchers propose a new genus called Rungwecebus. The genus name refers to Mt. Rungwe, where this monkey was first observed. So, the monkey's name is now Rungwecebus kipunji. Scientists continue to debate the decision to create a new genus, but if it sticks, it would be the first new monkey genus to be recognized since the 1920s.—E. Sohn

New Monkey Business
New Monkey Business








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™