Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Seeds of the Future
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Behavior
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Birds
Penguins
Birds We Eat
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
A New Basketball Gets Slick
The metal detector in your mouth
These gems make their own way
Computers
Computers with Attitude
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
Meet the new dinos
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
A Great Quake Coming?
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Environment
Bald Eagles Forever
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Halibut
Skates
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Surviving Olympic Heat
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Corals
Lobsters
Spiders
Mammals
Sperm Whale
Flying Foxes
Lion
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
One ring around them all
IceCube Science
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Iguanas
Gila Monsters
Asp
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Toy Challenge
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on a Rocky Road
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

New Mammals

We often hear about animals that are disappearing. As people destroy forests, spoil rivers, and ruin other vital habitats, animals and plants are becoming extinct at a rapid and alarming rate. Now, brace yourself for some good news. Two groups of researchers in Africa have identified a new species of monkey previously unknown to science. Meanwhile, another group of researchers has discovered a strange, new type of rodent in Laos that belongs in its own family. It's the first time in 31 years that anyone has found an entirely new family of any type of mammal. The new monkey is called the highland mangabey, or Lophocebus kipunji. Tim Davenport of Mbeya, Tanzania, and his team found it after checking out stories of a shy monkey with an unusual appearance around Mount Rungwe in Tanzania. When the biologists saw the animal, they were able to get a good enough look to identify it as a new species. Davenport works in Tanzania for the Wildlife Conservation Society. At about the same time, wildlife biologist Trevor Jones followed reports of what people thought were endangered monkeys called sanje mangabeys. The monkeys were spotted living in a certain remote forest of Tanzania, about 370 kilometers away from Mount Rungwe. When Jones started exploring the site, he saw brown monkeys with high crests of hair. These, he knew, were not sanje mangabeys. "I was immediately gobsmacked," he says. The monkeys turned out to be highland mangabeys. It's extremely rare to find an entirely new monkey species, especially in Africa. Most recent finds have been in Asia. Researchers are now calling for an immediate end to logging in the areas where the new monkeys live. The fear is that the monkeys may disappear as suddenly as they were discovered. Their habitats are already dwindling. In Asia, the new rodent was discovered by a team working in forested areas of Laos. The team, which is sponsored by the Wildlife Conservation Society, has surveyed the environment and local markets for years. Since 1996, the researchers have occasionally bought an animal that local people call kha-nyou. It looks a bit like a rat with extra-long whiskers, dark fur, and a furry tail. Its average size is about 25 centimeters (nearly 10 inches) long. Recently, the WCS team asked scientists who classify animals to look at the rodent's teeth, bones, and DNA. These scientists decided that it belongs in a new mammal family called Laonastidae. The rodent's scientific name is now Laonastes aenigmamus. Both discoveries are exciting hints of a world full of secrets still remaining to be discovered.—E. Sohn

New Mammals
New Mammals








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™