Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Toads
Animals
Clone Wars
Polar Bears in Trouble
Fishy Cleaners
Behavior
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
How Much Babies Know
Birds
Penguins
Cassowaries
Ibises
Chemistry and Materials
Undercover Detectives
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
The science of disappearing
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Fingerprint Evidence
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Inspired by Nature
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fakes in the museum
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The Color of Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Play for Science
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Horseshoe Crabs
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Hamsters
Dogs
Wombats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Black Hole Journey
IceCube Science
One ring around them all
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Nature's Alphabet
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Lizards
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
A Moon's Icy Spray
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Light Delay
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Middle school science adventures
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Where rivers run uphill
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

New Gene Fights Potato Blight

If you’re like most people, the biggest potato crisis you ever face is the common lunchtime question: “Do you want fries or chips with that?”

Potato farmers have much bigger worries. A serious disease called blight threatens potatoes all over the world. Millions of people starved when the disease destroyed potato crops in Ireland and elsewhere 150 years ago. Today, farmers spend billions of dollars every year to fight the disease.

Now, scientists say they have found a new weapon against blight: a potato that has already solved the problem on its own.

A wild variety of potato called Solanum bulbocastanum is immune to blight. Researchers from Wisconsin and California extracted four carefully chosen genes from a batch of S. bulbocastanum plants. They then spliced one gene into each of four groups of potato plants.

When the researchers exposed all four groups of potatoes to the funguslike organisms that cause blight, one bunch stayed healthy. The scientists think the gene that went into the healthy bunch is critical for blight resistance.

Farmers normally use toxic chemicals to fight blight. Using genetic engineering techniques could be less expensive and kinder to the environment, some researchers say.

Other people are more concerned about transferring genes from one species to another. No one knows how the technology will affect the environment or evolution.

Still, the possibility of keeping potato crops strong and healthy is appealing. Among other things, it would mean a steady supply of french fries for years to come. And, goodness knows, a french fry crisis would be quite hard for many of us to bear!—E. Sohn

New Gene Fights Potato Blight
New Gene Fights Potato Blight








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™