Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Ants on Stilts
A Meal Plan for Birds
New Mammals
Behavior
Wired for Math
Primate Memory Showdown
Pipefish power from mom
Birds
Hawks
Doves
Emus
Chemistry and Materials
Fog Buster
Music of the Future
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Programming with Alice
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
Middle school science adventures
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Recipe for a Hurricane
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
To Catch a Dragonfly
Shrinking Fish
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Writing on eggshells
Settling the Americas
Fish
Codfish
Barracudas
Electric Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Strong Bones for Life
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Play for Science
Human Body
Electricity's Spark of Life
Gut Microbes and Weight
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Millipedes
Butterflies
Mammals
Sheep
Cocker Spaniels
Bats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
The Particle Zoo
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Flower family knows its roots
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Asp
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Ready, Set, Supernova
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants

What could be worse than toxic sludge seeping into soil, poisoning animals and people? The headache of cleaning up all that muck. For years, engineers have struggled to get oil and tar out of the ground at hazardous-waste sites around the United States. Current methods are costly and inefficient. Now, environmental engineers from Cornell University say they may have a better solution. Their strategy involves nanotechnology, a new type of science involving very, very tiny things. In this case, the researchers created a special type of particle, measuring just 20 nanometers across. In comparison, each hair on your head is about 50,000 nanometers wide. The surface of the particle attracts water. The inside avoids water. The engineers then pumped a solution containing the new particles into a column of sand that was contaminated with a chemical called phenanthrene. The chemical is often found in coal tar. The nanoparticles were small enough to move through spaces between the sand grains. As the particles moved upward from the bottom of the sand column, their water-hating interiors sucked phenanthrene out of the sand, trapping it inside. The next challenge is to figure out how to make sure the cleanser nanoparticles return to the surface of the soil, where they can be gathered up and flushed clean of chemicals. To get around that problem, another group of scientists is trying to make nanoparticles that can convert contaminants into less harmful chemicals. That way, the particles could just stay in the soil. Smaller may really be better when it comes to cleaning up contaminated soil.—E. Sohn

Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™