Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Vampire Bats on the Run
A Tongue and a Half
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Seeing red means danger ahead
Homework blues
Birds
Tropical Birds
Robins
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
Sugary Survival Skill
Makeup Science
Computers
Music of the Future
The Shape of the Internet
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Ferocious Growth Spurts
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Weird, new ant
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Life under Ice
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Nurse Sharks
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Hammerhead Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Teen Brains, Under Construction
A Better Flu Shot
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Mosquitos
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Badgers
Seal
Bears
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
The algae invasion
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Caimans
Tortoises
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Slip-sliding away
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Bionic Bacteria
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on a Rocky Road
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Warmest Year on Record
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Nanomagnets Corral Oil

You’ve probably seen some of the cool things magnets can do. Place one near a paper clip, and the clip zooms across the table toward the magnet. Hold one magnet near another, and the second one mysteriously darts in the opposite direction. If you didn’t know about science, magnet tricks might seem like magic tricks. Now, scientists have discovered another magnetic trick. By mixing unbelievably small magnets with oil, bigger magnets can be used to move the oily globs around. The trick isn’t just cool to watch. Some day, the technique could help clean up messy oil spills in the sea mistakenly dumped by ships. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh make teeny tiny magnets out of two metals: iron and cobalt. Unlike the palm-sized magnets you may have played with in school, these magnets are measured in nanometers. One nanometer equals one-billionth of a meter. That may be hard to picture, so think of this: A human hair is about 80,000 nanometers wide.(Read this story to learn more.) To simulate an oil spill in the ocean, the CMU scientists plopped a few drops of mineral oil onto the surface of some water in a petri dish, a small container used in a lab. The scientists dyed the oil blue to make it stand out. Next, they mixed a bunch of tiny nanomagnets into another batch of oil, creating a black liquid. Using an eye dropper, the scientists added some of this syrupy black stuff to the petri dish. Almost immediately, the black syrup surrounded the blue oil in the center of the dish. Afterward, the researchers placed a strong magnet next to the dish. Right away, the nanomagnet-filled syrup floated toward the big magnet. More importantly, it brought the blue oil with it.One hope is that the technique might some day help clean up oil spills. Using vats of nanomagnets and large magnetic fences, workers might round up oil spills at sea and prevent them from harming the environment and killing animals. Many challenges remain, however. Nanomagnets are expensive to make, for one thing, and it would take a lot of them to clean up a big spill. In addition, scientists will want to find a way to gather the little magnets back up once they’ve finished their work. They’ll also need to figure out what to do with the oil once it’s been gathered and moved. For now, what’s exciting is that the CMU scientists have overcome the first hurdle: showing that the idea can work.

Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Nanomagnets Corral Oil








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™