Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Red Apes in Danger
A Wild Ferret Rise
Behavior
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Island of Hope
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
Quails
Kookaburras
Swans
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Undercover Detectives
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Hubble trouble doubled
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Supersight for a Dino King
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Environment
A Change in Time
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Ancient Cave Behavior
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Electric Eel
White Tip Sharks
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Symbols from the Stone Age
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Play for Science
Human Body
A New Touch
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Scallops
Praying Mantis
Crabs
Mammals
Skunks
Giant Panda
Bobcats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Road Bumps
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Springing forward
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Tortoises
Box Turtles
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Dancing with Robots
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Reach for the Sky
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Mussels

The term mussel is used for several families of bivalve mollusks inhabiting lakes, rivers, and creeks, as well as intertidal areas along coastlines worldwide. The freshwater mussels (several allied families, the largest being the Unionidae) and saltwater mussels (family Mytilidae) are not closely related, and are grouped in different subclasses, despite some similarities in appearance. The freshwater Zebra mussels and their relatives (family Dreissenidae) live attached to rocks in a manner similar to marine mussels, but are classified with the Heterodonta, the taxonomic group including most bivalves referred to as "clams". External anatomy: The mussel's external shell is composed of two valves that protect it from predators and desiccation. Protruding from a valve is an enlarged structure called the umbo, which indicates the dorsal surface of the mussel. Foot: Like most bivalves, mussels have a large organ referred to as a foot, which is tongue-like in shape with a groove on the ventral surface, which is continuous with the byssus pit. In this pit a viscous secretion is poured out which enters the groove and hardens gradually when it comes into contact with sea water. This forms an extremely tough byssus thread that secures the mussel to its substrate. Feeding: Both marine and freshwater mussels are filter feeders that feed on plankton. They do so by drawing water in through their incurrent siphon. The water is then brought into the branchial chamber by the actions of the cilia located on the gills for cilliary-mucus feeding. The waste water exits out through the excurrent siphon. The labial palps finally funnel the food into the mouth where digestion can continue. Clumping: Marine mussels are usually found clumping together on the wave-washed rocks with one another, which anchors them against the force of the waves. Those mussels found in the middle of a clump will have less water loss due to water capture by the other mussels. Predators: Marine mussels in the wild are eaten by starfish, while living freshwater mussels are a favored source of food for muskrats, otters, raccoons and other mammals. Outside fertilization: Both marine and freshwater mussels are gonochoristic, with separate male and female individuals. In marine mussels, fertilization occurs outside the body, and there is a larval stage that drifts for a period of from three weeks to six months before settling down on a hard surface as a young mussel. There, it is capable of moving slowly by means of attaching and detaching byssal threads to attain a better life position. Flushing oxygen-rich water: Freshwater mussels also reproduce sexually. Sperm released by the male directly into the water enters the female via the incurrent siphon. After fertilization, the eggs develop into the larval stage called glochidia. The glochidia grow in the gills of the female where they are constantly flushed with oxygen-rich water. For a time, these glochidia are parasitic on fish, attaching themselves to the fish's fins or gills. They grow and then break free from the host and drop to the bottom of the water. If they land in a place that suits their needs, they will continue their development and begin their independent life. Freshwater mussel glochidia are generally species-specific and will only live if they find the correct fish host. Reproduction in the Dreissenidae (zebra mussels and their relatives) is similar to that of the marine mussels.

Mussels
Mussels








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™