Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Got Milk? How?
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Helping the Cause of Macaws
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Behavior
Surprise Visitor
The Electric Brain
Making light of sleep
Birds
Woodpecker
Birds We Eat
Falcons
Chemistry and Materials
The hottest soup in New York
Cold, colder and coldest ice
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Lighting goes digital
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Island of Hope
Riding to Earth's Core
Warmest Year on Record
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Meet your mysterious relative
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Carp
Skates and Rays
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
It's a Math World for Animals
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Gut Germs to the Rescue
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Spiders
Worms
Snails
Mammals
Cornish Rex
Beagles
Squirrels
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
IceCube Science
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Springing forward
When Fungi and Algae Marry
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Copperhead Snakes
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
A Moon's Icy Spray
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Beyond Bar Codes
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Where rivers run uphill
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Watering the Air
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Musclebots Take Some Steps

You've probably heard of robots. Now, make way for musclebots. Scientists in California have made tiny walking machines out of heart muscle grown from rat cells. When the muscle contracts, then relaxes, the musclebot takes a step. The entire device is tinier than a comma. Viewed under a microscope, "they move very fast," says bioengineer Jianzhong Xi of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). "The first time I saw that, it was kind of scary." Scientists have already used muscle tissue to make machines, but these earlier machines were much larger than the new musclebots. A few years ago, for instance, a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology made a palm-sized device, called a biomechatronic fish, which swam by using living muscle tissue taken from frogs' legs. Adding muscles to a minuscule machine requires a different approach. Instead of using whole tissue, the scientists grew a thin film of heart muscle right on their bot. To do this, they borrowed some methods from the industry that makes chips for computers and other high-tech devices. But these methods can harm cells, so the team also invented some cell-friendly techniques to help do the job. In the end, the musclebot looks like a golden arch, coated on its inner surface with muscle. Kept alive in a special solution containing glucose, the heart muscle cells beat, causing the bot to scoot along. When the muscle contracts, the arch squeezes together, and the back leg moves forward. When the muscle relaxes, the arch widens, and the front leg moves forward. Researchers envision a number of applications for the new technology, including musclebots that deliver drugs directly to the cells that need them. They might also be useful for building other tiny machines, converting muscle motion into electric power for microcircuits, or studying muscle tissue. So far, musclebots can move only in one direction, and they can't be easily turned on and off. Future versions are sure to be more versatile.E. Sohn

Musclebots Take Some Steps
Musclebots Take Some Steps








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™