Agriculture
Springing forward
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Insects Take a Breather
New Mammals
Little Bee Brains That Could
Behavior
Puberty gone wild
Math is a real brain bender
Making Sense of Scents
Birds
Lovebirds
Backyard Birds
Turkeys
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Lighting goes digital
Computers
Computers with Attitude
Look into My Eyes
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Island of Hope
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Ready, unplug, drive
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Stonehenge Settlement
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Trout
Great White Shark
Codfish
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Yummy bugs
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Monkeys Count
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
A Long Haul
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Worms
Beetles
Crabs
Mammals
Quolls
Foxes
Rhinoceros
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Springing forward
Farms sprout in cities
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Snakes
Crocodilians
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Weaving with Light
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Moths

A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. Both are of the order Lepidoptera. Most species of moths are nocturnal, but there are crepuscular (twilight-dwelling) and diurnal (day-dwelling) species. Crops around the world: Moths, and more particularly their caterpillars, are a major agricultural pest in many parts of the world. The caterpillar of the Gypsy moth causes severe damage to forests in the North East USA, where it is an exotic species. In temperate climates the Codling moth causes extensive damage, especially to fruit farms. In tropical and subtropical climates the diamondback moth is perhaps the most serious pest of certain crops. Serious munchers: Several moth species in the family Tineidae are commonly regarded as pests because their larvae eat fabric such as clothes and blankets made from natural fibers (like wool or silk.) They are less likely to eat mixed materials containing artificial fibres. There are some reports that they can be repelled by the scent of wood from juniper and cedar, by lavender or by other natural oils. However, many consider this unlikely to prevent infestation. Naphthalene (the chemical used in mothballs) is considered more effective, but there are concerns over its effects on health. Silk creators : Some moths are farmed. Most notable is the silkworm (the larva of the domesticated moth Bombyx mori), farmed for the silk with which it builds its cocoon. The silk industry produces over 130 million kg of raw silk, worth about 250 million US dollars worldwide. Not all silk is produced by Bombyx mori. There are several species that are also farmed for their silk, such as the Ailanthus moth, the Chinese Oak Silkmoth, the Assam Silkmoth and Japanese Silk Moth. Follow the round light... Moths are apparently attracted to light, or more specifically, are known to circle bright objects. The reason for this behaviour is not known. It may be moths navigate by maintaining a constant angular relationship to a bright celestial light (such as the moon), but on encountering a bright artificial light it navigates by maintaining a constant angle to the light, resulting in the moth flying in a spiral until it hits the light source. Night pollinators: Night-blooming flowers usually depend on moths (or bats) for pollination, and artificial lighting can draw moths away from the flowers, affecting the plant's ability to reproduce. For this reason, light pollution is coming under increasing scrutiny as a source of many subtle ecological changes.

Moths
Moths








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™