Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Lives of a Mole Rat
Little Bee Brains That Could
Behavior
Newly named fish crawls and hops
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Birds
Parrots
Pheasants
Eagles
Chemistry and Materials
The newest superheavy in town
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Living Fossil
Dino Takeout for Mammals
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Rocking the House
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Catching Some Rays
Flu river
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Hammerhead Sharks
Barracudas
Skates
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chew for Health
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Monkeys Count
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Flatworms
Starfish
Mammals
Great Danes
Beavers
Humans
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Dreams of Floating in Space
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Surprise Visitor
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Crocodilians
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Crime Lab
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Arctic Melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Moon Crash, Splash

There are many ways to study the moon: Look through a telescope, measure its movement across the sky, or watch for mountains (with special sunglasses) as it passes across the sun during an eclipse, for example. But here’s one way that’s a little unusual: crash a rocket into it and see what happens. That’s exactly what NASA did in October, when scientists steered a rocket and a small spacecraft, called LCROSS, right into a dark crater on the moon’s surface. Just as a rock falling into a pond will cause a splash, the rocket’s crash on the solid moon sent up a cloud of dust and debris (also called a “plume”). This plume was large enough to be seen with telescopes on Earth — but just barely. Scientists had hoped to study the plume to find out whether or not this dark crater held water.Now, the scientists have finished their first study of the plume — and found water. In a recent press conference, scientist Anthony Colaprete announced that the plume contained at least 25 gallons of water vapor and ice. Colaprete, a scientist at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., works on the LCROSS project. (LCROSS stands for Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite.) The LCROSS spacecraft flew to the moon on the back of a Centaur rocket. Just as the pair approached the moon, they separated. The Centaur rocket plunged into the moon and sent up a plume, and LCROSS flew through it — just before crashing and, as a result, sending up a second plume. As LCROSS passed through the Centaur’s plume, it used nine different devices — including five cameras — to take measurements of the dust and debris. But the cameras didn’t deliver evidence of water. Instead, the scientists used an instrument called a spectrometer. A spectrometer is a tool that uses light, or radiation, to identify the chemical makeup of a material. It gets its name from the “spectrum,” which refers to all the different kinds of electromagnetic radiation. An infrared spectrometer measures something we can’t see with our eyes: infrared radiation. (Although infrared radiation isn’t visible, it can be felt. Heat is an example of infrared radiation.) The infrared spectrometer on board LCROSS took measurements of infrared radiation as the spacecraft passed through the plume. Scientists have long known that molecules like water absorb infrared radiation in particular patterns. So if they see a particular pattern, they know that water molecules are present. The patterns observed by the infrared spectrometer on LCROSS showed that water molecules had absorbed infrared radiation. Another spectrometer on LCROSS that can detect a different kind of radiation, called ultraviolet radiation, was also important for finding water. That instrument found the pattern of a piece broken off a water molecule – that piece is called hydroxyl. Both of these measurements together “made us really confident” that there’s water in the lunar crater, Colaprete told Science News. Finding water on the moon meant LCROSS accomplished its mission, but now scientists have to face a new round of questions. We don’t know, for example, whether or not all lunar craters have as much water in them. Plus, scientists want to know where the water came from. Maybe it came from nearby comets flying by; maybe it came from chemical reactions. Answering these questions may help scientists learn how the moon formed in the first place. And answering these questions will no doubt lead to more, deeper questions — but that’s the nature of science.

Moon Crash, Splash
Moon Crash, Splash








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™