Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Dolphin Sponge Moms
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Behavior
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Taking a Spill for Science
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Eagles
Pelicans
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Supersonic Splash
When frog gender flips
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
Hubble trouble doubled
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
The man who rocked biology to its core
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
To Catch a Dragonfly
Shrimpy Invaders
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
Settling the Americas
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Manta Rays
Piranha
Barracudas
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
A Taste for Cheese
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Monkeys Count
Math of the World
Human Body
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Nature's Medicines
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Shrimps
Jellyfish
Mammals
Kangaroos
Canines
Oxen
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
Project Music
Invisibility Ring
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Pythons
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Killers from Outer Space
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Revving Up Green Machines
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Monkeys in the Mirror

Some days, when you view yourself in the mirror, you might look really good. Other days, you might not be so happy with what you see. Either way, you know who you're looking at: You. Capuchin monkeys have a different experience, a recent study discovered. When these little primates see themselves in a mirror, they know they are looking at something interesting. They're just not exactly sure what it is. Scientists define an animal as "self-aware" if it touches a painted spot on its own face when it looks in a mirror. People start to recognize themselves in this way at around age 2. Apes and dolphins figure it out in adulthood. Most monkeys, on the other hand, ignore facial markings. They just don't understand that the image in the mirror is their own. To find out whether capuchins are self-aware, psychologist Frans B.M. de Waal of Emory University in Atlanta and his colleagues studied eight female and six male monkeys that live at a research facility in Georgia. Each capuchin entered a test chamber, where it was presented with three different situations. In the first, the monkey saw an unfamiliar monkey of the same sex on the other side of a glass barrier and behind a mesh screen. In the second scenario, the capuchin saw a monkey of the same sex that it was familiar with. Finally, it confronted its own reflection in a mirror behind the screen. The tests lasted for 15 minutes. Each monkey faced each test scenario twice. When monkeys saw other monkeys that they already knew, they didn't do much. When shown an unfamiliar monkey, males made threatening gestures. Females looked nervous and avoided eye contact. These were all natural reactions. When the monkeys saw their own reflections, however, something odd happened. Females looked into their own eyes and acted friendly. They swayed and smacked their lips, as if they were flirting. Males also made more eye contact with their reflections than they did with the animals in the other two scenarios. Unlike females, though, they squealed, curled up on the floor, tried to escape the chamber, and otherwise acted confused and distressed. The study shows that capuchins have some medium level of self-awareness, de Waal concludes. They don't quite see the image as another monkey. Nor do they see it as themselves. Other experts disagree. It is possible, they say, that capuchins simply respond to mirrors as they would to another monkey who won't stop imitating them. And everyone knows how flattering or annoying a copycat can be.—E. Sohn

Monkeys in the Mirror
Monkeys in the Mirror








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™