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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
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Deep Krill
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
From Chimps to People
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Hitting the redo button on evolution
The Smell of Trust
Birds
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Supergoo to the rescue
When frog gender flips
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
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Games with a Purpose
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The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
A Big, Weird Dino
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Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Island Extinctions
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
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Making good, brown fat
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Yummy bugs
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How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Prime Time for Cicadas
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Sun Screen
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Walking Sticks
Mollusks
Mammals
Badgers
German Shepherds
Coyotes
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
One ring around them all
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Road Bumps
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Getting the dirt on carbon
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Caimans
Sea Turtles
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Catching a Comet's Tail
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Weaving with Light
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Where rivers run uphill
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Monkeys Count

Monkey see, monkey hear, monkey count. Rhesus monkeys can match the number of faces they see to the number of voices they hear, a new study shows. This finding suggests that monkeys can keep track of small numbers, and they don't need language to do it. For the study, researchers at Duke University in Durham, N.C., and their colleagues worked with 20 male monkeys that live at a research institute. Each monkey sat in front of two video monitors. On one monitor, they could watch the faces of two monkeys making noises for a minute. The other monitor showed the faces of three monkeys, also making noises for a minute. As the animals watched the screens, they heard recordings of either two or three monkeys making loud, cooing sounds. The results showed that monkeys looked longer at the screen that showed the same number of faces as the number of voices that they heard. Such a response shows that the monkeys could tell the difference between "two" and "three" across two senses—vision and hearing, the researchers say. The animals seemed to understand that "two" and "three" are concepts that cross categories. The research adds to growing evidence that a wide range of animals have a strong sense of numbers. Some can even add and subtract. It's still probably not a good idea, however, to ask a monkey for help with your math homework!—E. Sohn

Monkeys Count
Monkeys Count








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