Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Fast-flying fungal spores
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Behavior
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
A Global Warming Flap
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Parakeets
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
The hottest soup in New York
Makeup Science
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
Games with a Purpose
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Tiny Pterodactyl
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
Improving the Camel
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Early Maya Writing
A Long Haul
Fish
Nurse Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Deep-space dancers
Play for Science
Human Body
Foul Play?
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Lice
Moths
Flatworms
Mammals
Cocker Spaniels
Prairie Dogs
Manatees
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Electric Backpack
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Stalking Plants by Scent
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Iguanas
Crocodilians
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Ready, unplug, drive
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Change in Climate
Arctic Melt
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Mollusks

Although mollusks are probably best known for their unique shells, the word itself actually comes from he Latin word for "soft." Beneath their shells, mollusks are actually very soft-bodied invertebrates (no spine) -- and some of the most well-known mollusks (like the octopus, for example) have no shells at all. Mollusks share a mantle (a fold of skin that lines the shell, when present) and a muscular foot that they use for motion. Many types of mollusks are raised and captured for food -- squid and clams, for example -- and some people consider eating snails a true delicacy. The mollusks are members of the large and diverse phylum Mollusca, which includes a variety of familiar creatures well-known for their decorative shells or as seafood. These range from tiny snails, clams, and abalone to the octopus, cuttlefish and squid (which are considered the most intelligent invertebrates). There are some 70,000 described species within this phylum. The giant squid, which until recently had not been observed alive in its adult form, is the largest invertebrate; although it is likely that the Colossal Squid is even larger. The scientific study of mollusks is called malacology. The mollusk's body is often divided into a head, with eyes or tentacles, a muscular foot and a visceral mass housing the organs. Mollusks have a mantle, which is a fold of the outer skin lining the shell, and a muscular foot that is used for motion. Many mollusks have their mantle produce a calcium carbonate external shell and their gill extracts oxygen from the water and disposes waste. All species have a complete digestive tract that starts from the mouth to the anus. Many have a feeding structure, the radula, mostly composed of chitin. Radulae are diverse within the Mollusca, ranging from structures used to scrape algae off rocks, to the harpoon-like structures of cone snails. Cephalopods (squid, octopuses, cuttlefish) also possess a chitinous beak. Unlike the closely related annelids, mollusks lack body segmentation. Development passes through one or two trochophore stages, one of which (the veliger) is unique to the group. These suggest a close relationship between the mollusks and various other protostomes, notably the Annelids. Mollusk fossils are some of the best known and are found from the Cambrian onwards.

Mollusks
Mollusks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™