Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Middle school science adventures
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Sea Lilies on the Run
Living in the Desert
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Double take
Birds
Storks
Condors
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
The science of disappearing
The Shape of the Internet
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
A Volcano Wakes Up
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Chicken of the Sea
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Codfish
White Tip Sharks
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Chocolate Rules
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
It's a Math World for Animals
Detecting True Art
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Dreaming makes perfect
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Flies
Bedbugs
Sea Anemones
Mammals
Coyotes
Bobcats
Bats
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Black Hole Journey
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Springing forward
Fastest Plant on Earth
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Garter Snakes
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
A Smashing Display
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Weaving with Light
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Mockingbirds

Mockingbirds are a group of New World passerine birds best known for the habit of some species of mimicking the songs of other birds, often loudly and in rapid succession. Most species are tropical, but the Northern Mockingbird breeds throughout the United States and Canada. There are 17 species in four genera. Northern Mockingbird: The Northern Mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos, is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. The Northern Mockingbird breeds in southeastern Canada, the United States, northern Mexico, the Bahamas, Cayman Islands and the Greater Antilles. It is replaced further south by its close relative, the Tropical Mockingbird, Mimus gilvus. Nest and Territory: The Northern Mockingbird builds a twig nest in a dense shrub or tree, which it aggressively defends against other birds and animals, including humans. When a predator is persistent, Mockingbirds from neighboring territories, summoned by a distinct call, may join the attack. Other birds may gather to watch as the Mockingbirds harass the intruder. This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. This species has occurred in Europe as an extreme rarity. On the Hunt: These birds forage on the ground or in vegetation; they also fly down from a perch to capture food. They mainly eat insects, berries and seeds. While foraging they frequently spread their wings in a peculiar two-step motion to display the white patches. The purpose of this behavior is disputed. Some ornithologists say this is purely a territorial display, while others say that flashing the white patches startles hiding insects and forces them into the open. Annoying Neighbor: Mockingbirds' willingness to nest near houses, loud and frequent songs, and territorial defense often annoy people. John van der Linden, the author of the Eastern Birding Central FAQ, says that 25 to 50 percent of the e-mail questions he receives are about how to deal with annoying mockingbirds. Barons in the Trees: Mockingbirds have a strong preference for certain trees such as maple, sweetgum, and sycamore. They generally avoid pine trees after the other trees have grown their leaves. Also, they have a particular preference for high places, such as the topmost branches of trees. City Birds: Mockingbirds are often found in urban and suburban areas, where they perch on telephone poles, streetlights, or high points on buildings. While singing on a high perch they will often bolt several feet into the air in a looping motion, with wings outstretched to display their white underside, then land back on the perch without breaking a note. That serves as a territorial display.

Mockingbirds
Mockingbirds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™