Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Sleepless at Sea
Little Beetle, Big Horns
The History of Meow
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Reading Body Language
Birds
Owls
Swifts
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Lighting goes digital
Pencil Thin
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Music of the Future
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Fingerprinting Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Bugs with Gas
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Hammerhead Sharks
Parrotfish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Symbols from the Stone Age
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Monkeys Count
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Sea Urchin
Sponges
Mammals
Pekingese
Domestic Shorthairs
Echidnas
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Road Bumps
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Fast-flying fungal spores
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Box Turtles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Sounds of Titan
Mercury's magnetic twisters
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Searching for Alien Life
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Ready, unplug, drive
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Mockingbirds

Mockingbirds are a group of New World passerine birds best known for the habit of some species of mimicking the songs of other birds, often loudly and in rapid succession. Most species are tropical, but the Northern Mockingbird breeds throughout the United States and Canada. There are 17 species in four genera. Northern Mockingbird: The Northern Mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos, is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. The Northern Mockingbird breeds in southeastern Canada, the United States, northern Mexico, the Bahamas, Cayman Islands and the Greater Antilles. It is replaced further south by its close relative, the Tropical Mockingbird, Mimus gilvus. Nest and Territory: The Northern Mockingbird builds a twig nest in a dense shrub or tree, which it aggressively defends against other birds and animals, including humans. When a predator is persistent, Mockingbirds from neighboring territories, summoned by a distinct call, may join the attack. Other birds may gather to watch as the Mockingbirds harass the intruder. This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. This species has occurred in Europe as an extreme rarity. On the Hunt: These birds forage on the ground or in vegetation; they also fly down from a perch to capture food. They mainly eat insects, berries and seeds. While foraging they frequently spread their wings in a peculiar two-step motion to display the white patches. The purpose of this behavior is disputed. Some ornithologists say this is purely a territorial display, while others say that flashing the white patches startles hiding insects and forces them into the open. Annoying Neighbor: Mockingbirds' willingness to nest near houses, loud and frequent songs, and territorial defense often annoy people. John van der Linden, the author of the Eastern Birding Central FAQ, says that 25 to 50 percent of the e-mail questions he receives are about how to deal with annoying mockingbirds. Barons in the Trees: Mockingbirds have a strong preference for certain trees such as maple, sweetgum, and sycamore. They generally avoid pine trees after the other trees have grown their leaves. Also, they have a particular preference for high places, such as the topmost branches of trees. City Birds: Mockingbirds are often found in urban and suburban areas, where they perch on telephone poles, streetlights, or high points on buildings. While singing on a high perch they will often bolt several feet into the air in a looping motion, with wings outstretched to display their white underside, then land back on the perch without breaking a note. That serves as a territorial display.

Mockingbirds
Mockingbirds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™