Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
A Wild Ferret Rise
Fishy Sounds
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Meet your mysterious relative
Ear pain, weight gain
Birds
Pheasants
Flightless Birds
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
Bandages that could bite back
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Environment
Sounds and Silence
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
An Ancient Childhood
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Saltwater Fish
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Gut Microbes and Weight
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Bees
Krill
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Goats
Shih Tzus
Ponies
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
IceCube Science
Gaining a Swift Lift
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Making the most of a meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Snakes
Sea Turtles
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Catching a Comet's Tail
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Crime Lab
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
How to Fly Like a Bat
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Arctic Melt
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as the answer to a test question) while suppressing others (like what you did during vacation 3 years ago). The study may help explain how memory works and why it sometimes fails. To peer into how the brain digs up memories, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, showed people a documentary film. A week later, the scientists attempted to hypnotize the viewers. Some of the study participants were easily hypnotized. Others were not. While under hypnosis, participants were told to forget the movie. They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie. While they answered the questions, scanners monitored activity in their brains. Participants then went through the process a second time. But this time, they were told to remember the movie. Brain scans showed clear differences between people who succumbed to hypnosis and those who didn't. In general, those who weren't hypnotized showed more activity in more parts of their brains than those who were. But the people who entered the trancelike state showed extra activity in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex. The researchers think that this area of the brain may be responsible for preventing a person from recalling certain memories. So, the prefrontal cortex might be the executive decision maker on whether you remember something or not.—Emily Sohn

Memory by Hypnosis
Memory by Hypnosis








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