Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
A Wild Ferret Rise
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Monkey Math
Behavior
Lightening Your Mood
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Honeybees do the wave
Birds
Finches
Tropical Birds
Albatrosses
Chemistry and Materials
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Lowly Rumble
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Flu river
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Settling the Americas
Fish
Parrotfish
Hammerhead Sharks
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Symbols from the Stone Age
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Foul Play?
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Ticks
Scorpions
Mammals
Pugs
Quokkas
Oxen
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Springing forward
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Iguanas
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Catching Some Rays
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Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as the answer to a test question) while suppressing others (like what you did during vacation 3 years ago). The study may help explain how memory works and why it sometimes fails. To peer into how the brain digs up memories, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, showed people a documentary film. A week later, the scientists attempted to hypnotize the viewers. Some of the study participants were easily hypnotized. Others were not. While under hypnosis, participants were told to forget the movie. They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie. While they answered the questions, scanners monitored activity in their brains. Participants then went through the process a second time. But this time, they were told to remember the movie. Brain scans showed clear differences between people who succumbed to hypnosis and those who didn't. In general, those who weren't hypnotized showed more activity in more parts of their brains than those who were. But the people who entered the trancelike state showed extra activity in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex. The researchers think that this area of the brain may be responsible for preventing a person from recalling certain memories. So, the prefrontal cortex might be the executive decision maker on whether you remember something or not.—Emily Sohn

Memory by Hypnosis
Memory by Hypnosis








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