Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Springing forward
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Sea Lilies on the Run
Walks on the Wild Side
Living in the Desert
Behavior
The Disappearing Newspaper
The (kids') eyes have it
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Birds
Condors
Kiwis
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
Undercover Detectives
Watching out for vultures
A Spider's Silky Strength
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The science of disappearing
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
Shrinking Fish
Fungus Hunt
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Long Haul
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Salmon
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Building a Food Pyramid
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Losing with Heads or Tails
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Running with Sneaker Science
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Lice
Leeches
Daddy Long Legs
Mammals
German Shepherds
Woolly Mammoths
Wolves
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Speedy stars
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Fungus Hunt
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Crocodiles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
Cousin Earth
Return to Space
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
A Clean Getaway
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Recipe for a Hurricane
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as the answer to a test question) while suppressing others (like what you did during vacation 3 years ago). The study may help explain how memory works and why it sometimes fails. To peer into how the brain digs up memories, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, showed people a documentary film. A week later, the scientists attempted to hypnotize the viewers. Some of the study participants were easily hypnotized. Others were not. While under hypnosis, participants were told to forget the movie. They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie. While they answered the questions, scanners monitored activity in their brains. Participants then went through the process a second time. But this time, they were told to remember the movie. Brain scans showed clear differences between people who succumbed to hypnosis and those who didn't. In general, those who weren't hypnotized showed more activity in more parts of their brains than those who were. But the people who entered the trancelike state showed extra activity in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex. The researchers think that this area of the brain may be responsible for preventing a person from recalling certain memories. So, the prefrontal cortex might be the executive decision maker on whether you remember something or not.—Emily Sohn

Memory by Hypnosis
Memory by Hypnosis








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