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World’s largest lizard is venomous too
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The man who rocked biology to its core
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Global Warming Flap
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Stonehenge Settlement
Words of the Distant Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
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Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Detecting True Art
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Sun Screen
Heavy Sleep
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Black Widow spiders
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Kodiak Bear
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
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One ring around them all
Speedy stars
Invisibility Ring
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Fungus Hunt
Springing forward
Fastest Plant on Earth
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Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
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Ringing Saturn
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Riding Sunlight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Middle school science adventures
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as the answer to a test question) while suppressing others (like what you did during vacation 3 years ago). The study may help explain how memory works and why it sometimes fails. To peer into how the brain digs up memories, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, showed people a documentary film. A week later, the scientists attempted to hypnotize the viewers. Some of the study participants were easily hypnotized. Others were not. While under hypnosis, participants were told to forget the movie. They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie. While they answered the questions, scanners monitored activity in their brains. Participants then went through the process a second time. But this time, they were told to remember the movie. Brain scans showed clear differences between people who succumbed to hypnosis and those who didn't. In general, those who weren't hypnotized showed more activity in more parts of their brains than those who were. But the people who entered the trancelike state showed extra activity in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex. The researchers think that this area of the brain may be responsible for preventing a person from recalling certain memories. So, the prefrontal cortex might be the executive decision maker on whether you remember something or not.—Emily Sohn

Memory by Hypnosis
Memory by Hypnosis








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