Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Professor Ant
A Seabird's Endless Summer
Monkeys Count
Behavior
Calculating crime
Brain cells take a break
Lightening Your Mood
Birds
Storks
Nightingales
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Undercover Detectives
Music of the Future
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Getting in Touch with Touch
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Ancient Heights
Flower family knows its roots
Surf Watch
Environment
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Stone Age Sole Survivors
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Marlin
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Building a Food Pyramid
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Setting a Prime Number Record
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Sun Screen
A Fix for Injured Knees
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Shrimps
Leeches
Praying Mantis
Mammals
Bobcats
Dingoes
Humans
Parents
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Road Bumps
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Sweet, Sticky Science
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Snapping Turtles
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Beyond Bar Codes
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Change in Climate
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Megamouth Sharks

The Megamouth Shark (Megachasma pelagios) is an extremely rare and unusual species of shark, discovered in 1976, with 36 specimens known to be caught or sighted as of 2006. Like the basking shark and whale shark, it is a filter feeder, consuming plankton and jellyfish, and is distinctive for its large head with rubbery lips. It is so unlike any other type of shark that it is classified in its own family Megachasmidae, though it has been suggested that it may belong in the family Cetorhinidae of which the Basking shark is currently the sole member. The appearance of the Megamouth is distinctive. It has a large mouth with small teeth, a broad rounded snout (observers have mistaken it for a young orca), a generally brownish-blackish color on top and white underneath, and an asymmetrical tail with a long upper lobe, similar to the Thresher Shark. The interior of its gill slits are lined with finger-like gill rakers that capture its food. A relatively poor swimmer, the Megamouth has a soft, flabby body and lacks keels. The first Megamouth was captured on November 15, 1976 about 25 miles off the coast from Kaneohe, Hawaii when it became entangled in the sea anchor of a United States Navy ship. Examination of the 4.5 m (14.6 ft), 750 kg (1,650 lb) specimen by Leighton Taylor showed it to be an entirely unknown type of shark, rivaling the coelacanth as the most sensational discovery in ichthyology during the 20th century. The long delay between initial discovery (1976) and the scientific description (1983), became the focus of an elaborate practical joke by two friends of Leighton Taylor, Richard Ellis of the American Museum of Natural History and John McCosker, director of San Francisco's Steinhart Aquarium. Ellis and McCosker photocopied random articles from Japanese scientific journals and inserted photographs of the megamouth shark and a map of the type location and an English abstract, making it appear as if a Japanese team under guidance of John E. Randall of the Bishop Museum was to snatch the scientific merits of the description right from under Taylor's nose. An accomplice in Japan then mailed the "preprints" to Taylor, who was naturally dumbstruck. He then had his Japanese-American secretary translate the "paper", only to be told that it contained things like musings about the cat in Japanese art, and rhinoceroses in Ueno Zoo, but nothing about the megamouth shark. Hidden on the last page were the names of Ellis and McCosker, put there deliberately for Taylor to find them. Realizing he had been had, Taylor finally wrote up the description. The remark on its last page, "Particular thanks go to Richard Ellis and John McCosker for preparation of a preliminary manuscript which was of great help in the production of this final paper," is in reference to this incident.

Megamouth Sharks
Megamouth Sharks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™