Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Fast-flying fungal spores
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Newts
Animals
Roboroach and Company
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Cool Penguins
Behavior
Nice Chimps
Brain cells take a break
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Birds
Storks
Turkeys
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
The chemistry of sleeplessness
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
Hubble trouble doubled
It's a Small E-mail World After All
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
Downsized Dinosaurs
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Earth from the inside out
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Blooming Jellies
Saving Wetlands
Alien Invasions
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Ancient Cave Behavior
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Manta Rays
Electric Ray
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
It's a Math World for Animals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Spiders
Krill
Flies
Mammals
Bison
Deers
St. Bernards
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
How children learn
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
One ring around them all
IceCube Science
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Underwater Jungles
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Reptiles
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Planets on the Edge
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Reach for the Sky
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Mahi-Mahi

The Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as dolphin, dolphin-fish, or dorado, are surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shoretropical and subtropical waters world-wide. They are one of only two members of the Coryphaenidae family, the other being the Pompano dolphinfish. The name "mahi-mahi" ("strong-strong" in Hawaiian), particularly on restaurant menus, has been adopted in recent years to avoid confusing these fish with dolphins, members of the porpoise family, which are mammals Mahi-mahi have a lifespan of no more than 3 to 4 years. Sport catches average 7 to 13 kg (15 to 25 pounds). Though they can grow to be up to 45 kg (90 pounds) any Mahi-mahi over 40 pounds is exceptional. Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and long dorsal fins extending almost the entire length of their bodies. Their anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, bright blues and greens on the sides and back. Mature males also have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper. When they are removed from the water, the fish often change between several colors, finally fading to a muted yellow-gray upon death. Mahi-mahi are carnivorous, feeding on flying fish, crabs, squid, mackerel, and other small fish. They have also been known to eat zooplankton, squid, and crustaceans. Mahi-mahi are highly sought game fish throughout their range because of their beauty and fighting ability. Their flesh has excellent flavor and firm texture flavor. Mahi-mahi have become popular restaurant fare in many areas, sometimes eaten as a substitute for swordfish because, having scales, they are considered kosher. One of the fastest-growing fish, thought to live no more than 5 years; swimming speed is estimated at 50 knots; spawns in warm ocean currents throughout much of the year; young found in sargassum weed; feeds on flying fish and squid.

Mahi-Mahi
Mahi-Mahi








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™