Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Armadillo
Behavior
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Girls are cool for school
Birds
Chicken
Pigeons
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
The chemistry of sleeplessness
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Batteries built by Viruses
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Snow Traps
A Change in Time
Giant snakes invading North America
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Trout
Barracudas
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Chew for Health
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Foul Play?
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Wasps
Praying Mantis
Starfish
Mammals
Tigers
Coyotes
African Wildedbeest
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Sea Turtles
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Smashing Display
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Crime Lab
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Lungfish

Lungfishes are sarcopterygian fish belonging to the order Dipnoi. Sarcopterygii (from Greek sarx, flesh, and pteryx, fin) are bony fish with paired rounded fins. These fins, being similar to limbs, suggest that these fish may be ancestors of land vertebrates. The dentition of lungfish is conspicuously different from that of any other vertebrate group. Odontodes on the palate and lower jaws develop in a series of rows to form a fan-shaped occlusion surface. These odontodes then wear to form a uniform crushing surface. In several groups, including the modern lepidosireniformes, these ridges have been modified to form occluding blades. The modern lungfishes have a number of larval features, which suggest paedomorphosis. They also demonstrate the largest genome among the vertebrates. Modern lungfish all have an elongate body with fleshy paired pectoral and pelvic fins and a single unpaired caudal fin replacing the dorsal, caudal, and anal fin of most fishes. African and South American lungfish are capable of surviving seasonal drouts by burrowing into mud and estivating throughout the dry season. Changes in physiology allow the lungfish to slow its metabolism to 1/60th of the normal metabolic rate, and protein waste is converted from ammonia to less-toxic urea (normally, lungfish excrete nitrogenous waste as ammonia directly into the water). Burrowing is seen in at least one group of fossil lungfish, the Gnathorhizidae. Lungfish are best-known for retaining characteristics primitive within the Osteichthyes, including the ability to breathe air, and structures primitive within Sarcopterygii, including the presence of lobed fins with a well-developed internal skeleton. Today, they live only in Africa, South America, and Australia. While vicariance would suggest this represents an ancient distribution limited to the Mesozoic supercontinent Gondwana, the fossil record suggests that advanced lungfish had a cosmopolitan freshwater distribution and that the current distribution of modern lungfish species reflects extinction of many lineages following the breakup of both Pangea and subsequently Gondwana and Laurasia.

Lungfish
Lungfish








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™