Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Seeds of the Future
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Young Ants in the Kitchen
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Fear Matters
Internet Generation
Face values
Birds
Albatrosses
Flightless Birds
Cranes
Chemistry and Materials
Lighting goes digital
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
Games with a Purpose
The science of disappearing
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Downsized Dinosaurs
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Greener Diet
Springing forward
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
Saving Wetlands
Alien Invasions
Finding the Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
An Ancient Childhood
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Electric Eel
Sturgeons
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Sponges' secret weapon
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Play for Science
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Hear, Hear
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Flies
Fleas
Dust Mites
Mammals
Felines
Numbats
African Hippopotamus
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Particle Zoo
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Getting the dirt on carbon
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Chameleons
Caimans
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
A Dusty Birthplace
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Supersuits for Superheroes
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Middle school science adventures
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Lucky Survival for Black Cats

Black cats bring bad luck, according to superstition. But the same quirks of biology that make some cats black might also have protected the dark-haired felines from diseases a long time ago. In a range of animals, from mice to sheep, scientists have already identified two genes that play a role in coat color. Depending on how they work together, the two genes make an animal's fur look a range of colors, from reddish-yellow to blackish-brown. Now, a new study shows that solid-black house cats have a certain mutation in one of those genes. Black jaguars have a distinctive mutation in the other gene, and this defect is missing in jaguars that are more typically yellowish-brown in color. Meanwhile, dark-brown jaguarundis—felines native to South and Central America—have their own particular mutation in the second gene. The new findings made the researchers wonder why some cats are black in the first place. Camouflage at night is one explanation. Other research on coat-color genes suggests that the same mutation that makes some cats black might also have helped them resist a deadly infection thousands of years ago. So black cats may actually be the lucky ones after all.—E. Sohn

Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Lucky Survival for Black Cats








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™