Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Got Milk? How?
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Putting a Mouse on Pause
From Chimps to People
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Behavior
Internet Generation
Between a rock and a wet place
Wired for Math
Birds
Ibises
Turkeys
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
The metal detector in your mouth
Popping to Perfection
Computers
Hubble trouble doubled
New twists for phantom limbs
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Plastic-munching microbes
Wave of Destruction
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Alien Invasions
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Watching deep-space fireworks
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Hagfish
Seahorses
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The mercury in that tuna
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Math of the World
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Running with Sneaker Science
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Clams
Grasshoppers
Krill
Mammals
Tigers
Blue Whales
Dogs
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Speedy stars
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Making the most of a meal
Springing forward
Reptiles
Chameleons
Crocodilians
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Arctic Melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Losing with Heads or Tails

Heads, you win. Tails, you lose. It turns out that coin tosses may be less fair than you might think. A new mathematical analysis even suggests a way to increase your chances of winning. People use coin tosses all the time to make decisions and break ties. You've probably done it yourself to decide who gets the last piece of pizza or which team gets the ball first. Heads or tails? It's anybody's guess, but each side is supposed to have an equal chance of winning. That's not always true, say mathematicians from Stanford University and the University of California, Santa Cruz. For a coin toss to be truly random, they say, you have to flip the coin into the air so that it spins in just the right way. Most of the time, though, the coin doesn't spin perfectly. It might tip and wobble in the air. Sometimes it doesn't even flip over. In experiments, the researchers found that it's practically impossible to tell from watching a tossed coin whether it has flipped over. A tossed coin is typically in the air for just half a second, and a wobble can fool the eyes, no matter how carefully you watch. To see how wobbling affects the outcome, the researchers videotaped actual coin tosses and measured the angle of the coin in the air. They found that a coin has a 51 percent chance of landing on the side it started from. So, if heads is up to start with, there's a slightly bigger chance that a coin will land heads rather than tails. When it comes down to it, the odds aren't very different from 50-50. In fact, it would take about 10,000 tosses for you to really notice the difference. Still, when you're gunning for that last piece of candy, it can't hurt to have a leg up, no matter how small.E. Sohn

Losing with Heads or Tails
Losing with Heads or Tails








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™