Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Springing forward
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
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Vampire Bats on the Run
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Cacophony Acoustics
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The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
Baby Talk
Copycat Monkeys
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
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Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
Picture the Smell
A Light Delay
Computers
Nonstop Robot
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Troubles with Hubble
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An Ancient Feathered Biplane
A Dino King's Ancestor
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Earth Rocks On
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Environment
Ready, unplug, drive
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Perches
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Monkeys Count
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Hear, Hear
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Worms
Caterpillars
Mammals
Flying Foxes
Weasels
Chihuahuas
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Black Hole Journey
The Particle Zoo
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Fastest Plant on Earth
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Alligators
Iguanas
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
A Clean Getaway
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Change in Climate
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Losing with Heads or Tails

Heads, you win. Tails, you lose. It turns out that coin tosses may be less fair than you might think. A new mathematical analysis even suggests a way to increase your chances of winning. People use coin tosses all the time to make decisions and break ties. You've probably done it yourself to decide who gets the last piece of pizza or which team gets the ball first. Heads or tails? It's anybody's guess, but each side is supposed to have an equal chance of winning. That's not always true, say mathematicians from Stanford University and the University of California, Santa Cruz. For a coin toss to be truly random, they say, you have to flip the coin into the air so that it spins in just the right way. Most of the time, though, the coin doesn't spin perfectly. It might tip and wobble in the air. Sometimes it doesn't even flip over. In experiments, the researchers found that it's practically impossible to tell from watching a tossed coin whether it has flipped over. A tossed coin is typically in the air for just half a second, and a wobble can fool the eyes, no matter how carefully you watch. To see how wobbling affects the outcome, the researchers videotaped actual coin tosses and measured the angle of the coin in the air. They found that a coin has a 51 percent chance of landing on the side it started from. So, if heads is up to start with, there's a slightly bigger chance that a coin will land heads rather than tails. When it comes down to it, the odds aren't very different from 50-50. In fact, it would take about 10,000 tosses for you to really notice the difference. Still, when you're gunning for that last piece of candy, it can't hurt to have a leg up, no matter how small.E. Sohn

Losing with Heads or Tails
Losing with Heads or Tails








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