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Amphibians
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Tree Frogs
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Helping the Cause of Macaws
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Living in the Desert
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Supersonic Splash
Fish needs see-through head
Storing Memories before Bedtime
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Small but WISE
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The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
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Play for Science
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Hall of Dinos
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Bald Eagles Forever
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
A Long Trek to Asia
Settling the Americas
Fish
Catfish
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Whale Sharks
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The mercury in that tuna
A Taste for Cheese
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Math of the World
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Disease Detectives
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Octopuses
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Mammals
Flying Foxes
Minks
Wolves
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Powering Ball Lightning
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Flower family knows its roots
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
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Black Mamba
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Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
A Planet from the Early Universe
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Change in Climate
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Little Brown Bats

The Little Brown bat (sometimes called Little Brown myotis) (Myotis lucifugus) is one of the most common bats of North America, a species of the genus Myotis (mouse-eared bats), found throughout the world. Weights and Measures: As suggested by the bat’s name, their fur is glossy and uniformly dark brown on the back and upper parts with slightly paler, greyish fur underneath. Wing membranes are dark brown on a typical wingspan of 8.7-10.6 inches ( 221-269mm ). Ears are small and black with a short, rounded tragus. Adult bats are typically 4.6-5.6 inches (117-168mm ) long and weigh 0.19-0.46 ounces ( 5-13g ). All teeth including molars are relatively sharp, as is typical for an insectivore, and canines are prominent to enable grasping hard-bodied insects in flight. The Little Brown bat has an expected lifespan of up to 30 years. Little Browns Abound: The Little Brown bat is found all over North America from northern Mexico to southern Alaska, and is the most abundant bat found in the United States. Little Brown Babies: Little Brown bats give birth usually to a single young between the end of May through the middle of July with occasional twin births. The newborn is blind, opening their eyes on their second day, and remains attached to a nipple until it is approximately two weeks old. The young can fly at three weeks of age and attain adult weight at 4 weeks.

Little Brown Bats
Little Brown Bats








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