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Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
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Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
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Putting a Mouse on Pause
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Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
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Nightingales
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Silk’s superpowers
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Diamond Glow
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New eyes to scan the skies
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Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
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Have shell, will travel
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
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Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
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A Big Discovery about Little People
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Long Haul
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Nurse Sharks
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Recipe for Health
Building a Food Pyramid
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
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Play for Science
Detecting True Art
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Heart Revival
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
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Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Black Hole Journey
The Particle Zoo
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
The algae invasion
Plants Travel Wind Highways
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Turtles
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Space and Astronomy
A Planet from the Early Universe
Asteroid Moons
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
How to Fly Like a Bat
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Where rivers run uphill
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Lightening Your Mood

Although the idea of using light to help people with depression has been around for at least 20 years, there didn't seem to be much scientific evidence that this sort of therapy actually works. One of the many skeptics was psychiatrist Robert N. Golden of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. When Golden was invited to look into the evidence, he reviewed 173 published studies of light treatments. He found that only 20 of these studies were designed well enough to test what they were claiming to test. A closer look at these 20 studies, however, surprised Golden. He found that people with a type of depression called SAD improved when exposed to bright lights upon waking up or right before waking up. SAD stands for Seasonal Affective Disorder and applies to people who get especially down during certain times of the year, usually winter. Even people whose depression is not seasonal respond to light therapy, the studies showed. And if patients are taking medicines to counter depression, light therapy seems to enhance the effects of the drugs. Doctors suspect that light therapy helps depressed people regulate their internal biological clocks—the way their bodies react to the passage of time. The best treatment for depression, some experts suggest, is to combine light therapy with efforts to sleep on a regular schedule. Everyone gets the blues sometimes, but some people can feel so down that they need medical attention. More than just sadness, such serious depression is an illness that can make people feel hopeless and unable to get out of bed. Doctors often treat depression with drugs, but medicine may not be the only option. Bright lights may also do the trick. That's what a review commissioned by the American Psychiatric Association in Washington, D.C., has found.Other scientists say more research is needed. Exposure to bright lights could damage your eyes or cause other, unknown side effects, they say. So, if you're feeling really, really sad, talk to your doctor before staring at your desk lamp. Only an expert can tell you what kind of light to use and for how long—or even if it's the right thing to do.—E. Sohn

Lightening Your Mood
Lightening Your Mood








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