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Watering the Air
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Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Sea Lilies on the Run
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Video Game Violence
Copycat Monkeys
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
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The metal detector in your mouth
The newest superheavy in town
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
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Games with a Purpose
The Book of Life
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Feathered Fossils
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Have shell, will travel
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Rocking the House
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Plastic-munching microbes
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Bald Eagles Forever
Where rivers run uphill
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
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Settling the Americas
Of Lice and Old Clothes
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Chew for Health
Chocolate Rules
Yummy bugs
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
Germ Zapper
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Snails
Tapeworms
Sea Urchin
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Llamas
Boxers
Siberian Husky
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How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
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Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Extra Strings for New Sounds
One ring around them all
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Sea Turtles
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Return to Space
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Bionic Bacteria
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Charged cars that would charge
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Lightening Your Mood

Although the idea of using light to help people with depression has been around for at least 20 years, there didn't seem to be much scientific evidence that this sort of therapy actually works. One of the many skeptics was psychiatrist Robert N. Golden of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. When Golden was invited to look into the evidence, he reviewed 173 published studies of light treatments. He found that only 20 of these studies were designed well enough to test what they were claiming to test. A closer look at these 20 studies, however, surprised Golden. He found that people with a type of depression called SAD improved when exposed to bright lights upon waking up or right before waking up. SAD stands for Seasonal Affective Disorder and applies to people who get especially down during certain times of the year, usually winter. Even people whose depression is not seasonal respond to light therapy, the studies showed. And if patients are taking medicines to counter depression, light therapy seems to enhance the effects of the drugs. Doctors suspect that light therapy helps depressed people regulate their internal biological clocks—the way their bodies react to the passage of time. The best treatment for depression, some experts suggest, is to combine light therapy with efforts to sleep on a regular schedule. Everyone gets the blues sometimes, but some people can feel so down that they need medical attention. More than just sadness, such serious depression is an illness that can make people feel hopeless and unable to get out of bed. Doctors often treat depression with drugs, but medicine may not be the only option. Bright lights may also do the trick. That's what a review commissioned by the American Psychiatric Association in Washington, D.C., has found.Other scientists say more research is needed. Exposure to bright lights could damage your eyes or cause other, unknown side effects, they say. So, if you're feeling really, really sad, talk to your doctor before staring at your desk lamp. Only an expert can tell you what kind of light to use and for how long—or even if it's the right thing to do.—E. Sohn

Lightening Your Mood
Lightening Your Mood








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